answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

If the U.S. Supreme Court denies a petition for a writ of certiorari (a request to hear a case on appeal), then the decision of the lower court is final.

Denial of certiorari occurs in 98-99% of cases, and in no way implies that the court agrees with the lower court's decision. Denial only means that the case, as presented, isn't of sufficient importance to warrant a review, doesn't involve constitutional issues, conforms to a precedent already set, falls outside the court's jurisdiction, or is moot, etc.

Between 7,500 and 8,500 cases are presented for review each year, but the court can only choose 80-150 to hear, so the Justices have to limit themselves to those cases that have the greatest impact on the law and on society.

If a case is denied certiorari, the decision of the last "court of competent jurisdiction" to handle the case is affirmed and the case is concluded. Affirmation by default does not necessarily indicate the Supreme Court agrees with the lower court decision; nor does accepting a case for review necessarily mean the Court disagrees with the lower court decision.

User Avatar

Wiki User

∙ 13y ago
This answer is:
User Avatar
More answers
User Avatar

Wiki User

∙ 13y ago

The Supreme Court is the highest court in the land. Before a case could get to the Supreme Court, it would have to go through at least two other court levels first.

The Supreme Court is primarily an appellate court. Appellate courts do not try a case all over again. They only determine points of law and whether the law was correctly applied.

At least one of the court levels a case would go through before going to the Supreme Court is an appellate court. If the law in a certain area is well settled, and has been confirmed by an appellate court, there is generally no point in the Supreme Court hearing such an appeal.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

∙ 13y ago

The Supreme Court votes whether to accept cases for review. If fewer than four justices express interest in hearing the case, the petition is rejected and noted: Cert. denied (certiorari denied).

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

∙ 14y ago

There could be a number of reasons why this happens, and often "similar" cases are more different than they appear on their face. Considerations may include:

  1. Changed composition of the Court. Justices are generally aware of they way a ruling will go on a particular issue and may not want to address it when the majority opinion could set a precedent they find unacceptable. Conversely, a majority may choose to grant certiorari on a matter rejected by an earlier Court for the same reason.
  2. The matter may not yet be ripe for a decision. The case may not represent a significant national concern at one point in time, but later become important. One example addresses incorporation of the Second Amendment, an portion of the Bill of Rights that currently doesn't apply to the states, allowing individual states to regulate firearm access and use without intervention from the federal government. This became a major issue after the Supreme Court overturned a restrictive Washington, DC, gun law that infringed on citizens' Second Amendment rights. The decision in District of Columbia v. Heller, (2008), only applied to Washington, DC, because it is federal, not state, territory. This made a decision to hear a case related to Second Amendment rights of state citizens more compelling (ripe).
  3. The earlier case may not have reached far enough to touch constitutional issues the Court felt needed to be addressed, or may have reached too far to touch constitutional issues that the Court may feel would be disruptive or set a dangerous precedent.
  4. The justices may be aware that hearing a particular case will set a precedent affecting other, sometimes unrelated, matters they wish to control. An example of this would be the incremental decisions that allowed the concept of "corporate personhood" to override other precedents and change campaign finance laws.
  5. They may need to hear a case similar to one rejected earlier in order to resolve a circuit split (differences in the way the US Court of Appeals Circuit Courts interpret certain laws or constitutional issues).

Other reasons may apply.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

∙ 10y ago

They wouldn't. However, mistakes happen. The state courts mistake would be caught by the appellate court and sent back with a reminder or explanation of the Supreme Court's ruling. If a state is blatantly refusing to accept the Supreme courts ruling, they're in for a rude awakening before the US Congress and will be apart of a very nasty constitutional battle with the United States.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Dannetta Parker

Lvl 2
∙ 3y ago

What happens if the Supreme Court refuses to hear a case on appeal from the lower courts?

A.

The lower court’s ruling stands and cannot be repealed.

B.

The case sits in the Court’s docket for the next six months.

C.

The case immediately goes back to district courts for a re-trial.

D.

The case immediately goes back to the appellate courts for a re-trial.

Please select the best answer from the choices provided

A

B

C

D

Mark this and return

This answer is:
User Avatar

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: How does the Supreme Court refuse to review a case?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Related questions

Who decide whether or not the Supreme Court will review case?

who decides whether or not the supreme court will review a case


Who decided whether or not the Supreme Court will review a cases?

who decides whether or not the supreme court will review a case


What was the result of the Supreme Court case Marburg v. Madison?

The Supreme Court gained the power of judicial review.-Apex


When the supreme court accept a case for review it places it on the?

Docket


What does the US Supreme Court issue when it accepts a case for review?

A writ of certiorari is an order that allows the Supreme Court to review lower court cases. This writ is not limited to the Supreme Court, it may be used by any appellate court needing to review a case.


What was the effect of the Supreme Court case Marbury vs. Madison?

The Supreme Court gained the power of judicial review.


What was the supreme court of ruling in the Terry Shiavo Case?

The Supreme Court of the United States refused to review four appeals.


In order for the supreme court to accept a case for review the case must?

The case must be unique and important in order for the Supreme Court to accept the case. The case can also be accepted if it is to resolve a conflict of law.


What court case established the courts of judicial review?

Marbury v. Madison is the Supreme Court case that established the precedent of judicial review. John Marshall was the Chief Justice of the court.


Where does the Supreme Court get the power of Judicial Review?

From the case of Marbury v. Madison


What does the Supreme Court do when it grants review of a case?

When the US Supreme Court agrees to hear a case, it issues a legal order called a "writ of certiorari" telling the lower court to send up the case files.


When the supreme court accepts a case for review it places it on what kind of calendar?

Docket