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Q: How was the patriation of the Constitution in 1982a step toward nationhood?
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What are the advantages and disadvantages of fish preservation?

AdvantagesOne clear advantage of having a swimbladder is that little to no extra energy is necessary in order to remain stationary at a constant level of water. Only a slight control by use of the pectoral fins is required to balance out the propulsive force of water exiting the gills. Fish with no swimbladder on the other hand, such as mackerels, sharks, and rays must expend energy by constantly swimming in order to keep from sinking.Another advantage of swimbladders is oxygen storage. Physoclists and physostomes alike may occasionally use the oxygen present within their bladder as an emergency backup in times of urgent need, although, this emergency store can only be of aid for a few minutes (Jones 1957).Finally, swimbladders in some fish are known to increase hearing abilities. With the presence of inner ear- swimbladder connections, these fish have exhibited greater sensitivity to sound, however it is not yet clear whether there is also an increase in frequency selectivity (Coombs & Popper 1982a)DisadvantagesOne disadvantage of having a swimbladder is that neutral buoyancy can only be achieved at a small range of depths specific to certain fishes. If a fish swims below its buoyancy range, it will have to expend greater energy in the exercise of swimming in order to keep from sinking. On the other hand, if a fish swims above its upper buoyancy level, it becomes overly buoyant. Its swimbladder would expand to such a great capacity that the fish might be thrown out of control if it does not compensate for this increased buoyancy by vigorously swimming downward. The fuller the swimbladder gets, the more tipsy the fish is-- much like a large helium balloon. Therefore, many fish that do not have a swimbladder, such as the Atlantic mackerel, have greater depth flexibility and speed in moving through columns of water. A swimbladder would only serve as a constraint for these fish which are continuously active predators (Schmidt-Nielson 1997).One other disadvantage of having a swimbladder is that oftentimes the bladder serves as an acoustical target which sounds can be bounced off of. This might enable predators to more easily locate the fish (Schaefer & Oliver 1998).


What are the advantages and disadvantages of fishing?

AdvantagesOne clear advantage of having a swimbladder is that little to no extra energy is necessary in order to remain stationary at a constant level of water. Only a slight control by use of the pectoral fins is required to balance out the propulsive force of water exiting the gills. Fish with no swimbladder on the other hand, such as mackerels, sharks, and rays must expend energy by constantly swimming in order to keep from sinking.Another advantage of swimbladders is oxygen storage. Physoclists and physostomes alike may occasionally use the oxygen present within their bladder as an emergency backup in times of urgent need, although, this emergency store can only be of aid for a few minutes (Jones 1957).Finally, swimbladders in some fish are known to increase hearing abilities. With the presence of inner ear- swimbladder connections, these fish have exhibited greater sensitivity to sound, however it is not yet clear whether there is also an increase in frequency selectivity (Coombs & Popper 1982a)DisadvantagesOne disadvantage of having a swimbladder is that neutral buoyancy can only be achieved at a small range of depths specific to certain fishes. If a fish swims below its buoyancy range, it will have to expend greater energy in the exercise of swimming in order to keep from sinking. On the other hand, if a fish swims above its upper buoyancy level, it becomes overly buoyant. Its swimbladder would expand to such a great capacity that the fish might be thrown out of control if it does not compensate for this increased buoyancy by vigorously swimming downward. The fuller the swimbladder gets, the more tipsy the fish is-- much like a large helium balloon. Therefore, many fish that do not have a swimbladder, such as the Atlantic mackerel, have greater depth flexibility and speed in moving through columns of water. A swimbladder would only serve as a constraint for these fish which are continuously active predators (Schmidt-Nielson 1997).One other disadvantage of having a swimbladder is that oftentimes the bladder serves as an acoustical target which sounds can be bounced off of. This might enable predators to more easily locate the fish (Schaefer & Oliver 1998).


What are the pharmacodynamics of demerol?

normeperidine


What are some famous plays of Israel Horovitz?

PlaysThe Comeback,Suffolk Theatre, Emerson Theatre, Boston, MA, 1958The Death of Bernard the Believer,Il Cafe Cabaret Theatre, SouthOrange, NJ, 1960This Play Is about Me,Il Cafe Cabaret Theatre, 1961The Hanging of Emmanuel,Il Cafe Cabaret Theatre, 1962Hop, Skip, and Jump,Il Cafe Cabaret Theatre, 1963The Simon Street Harvest,Il Cafe Cabaret Theatre, 1964The Killer Dove(two-act), Theatre on the Green, West Orange, NY,1966Line(one-act), Cafe La MaMa, 13th Street Theatre, New York City,1967, then Theatre de Lys, New York City, 1971, also (as two-act), Mark TaperForum, Los Angeles, 1969; published inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus (Lyme, NH), 1996The Indian Wants the Bronx(one-act), Astor Place Theatre, New York City, 1968; published by Dramatists Play Service (New York City), 1968, inFirst Season,Random House (New York City), 1968, and inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith &Kraus, 1996It's Called the Sugar Plum(one-act), Astor Place Theatre, 1968; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1968, inFirst Season,Random House, 1968, and inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996Rats(one-act), Cafe Au Go Go, New York City, 1968; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1968, inFirst Season,Random House, 1968, inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996, and inTheatre for Young Audiences: Around theWorld in 21 Plays,1997Chiaroscuro(one-act; also known asChiaroscuro (or Morning)), Festival of Two Worlds, Spoleto Festival Theatre, Spoleto, Italy, 1968, then as "Morning,"Morning, Noon, and Night,Henry Miller's Theatre, New York City, 1968; published by Random House (New York City), 1969; publishedasMorninginIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996The Honest-to-God Schnozzola(one-act), Act IV Theatre, Provincetown, MA, 1968, then (withLeader), Gramercy Arts Theatre, New York City, 1969; published by Breakthrough Press, 1971, and inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996Leader(one-act; double-bill withThe Honest-to-God Schnozzola), Gramercy Arts Theatre, 1969; published withPlay for Trees,Dramatists Play Service, 1973Acrobats(one-act), Mickery Theatre, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1970,then (double-bill withLine), New Comedy Theatre, Theatre de Lys, NewYork City, 1971; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1971 and inIsraelHorovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996Clair-Obscur,Theatre Lucernairre, Paris, 1970; published by Gallimard, 1972Dr. Hero(also known asThe World's Greatest Play), PublicTheatre, New York City, 1971; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1973Le premiere,Theatre de Poche, Paris, 1972Shooting Gallery,Workshop of the Performing Arts Theatre, New York City, 1973; published withPlay for Germs,Dramatists Play Service,1973, and inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996Play for Germs(based on his television playVD Blues), published withShooting Galleryby Dramatists Play Service, 1973, and inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996Capella,published by Harper & Row (New York City), 1973 produced, 1978The Wakefield Plays(containsAlfred the Great,Hopscotch,Our Father's Failing,Alfred Dies,Stage Directions,Spared,andThe 75th), performed in various combinations between 1973 and 1986;Alfred the Greatpublished by Harper & Row, 1974,HopscotchandThe 75thpublished asHopscotch and The 75th: The Quannapowitt Quartet, Parts One and Two,by Dramatists Play Service, 1977, and inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996The First,The Last,andThe Middle(a "comic triptych"), 1974Turnstile,Hanover, NH, 1974Spared,1975 published inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996Uncle Snake: An Independence Day Pageant,New York City, 1975; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1976The Primary English Class,Cubicula Theatre, then Circle in the Square, both New York City, 1975; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1976The Bottom,1975-1976The Reason We Eat,Hartman Theatre, Stamford, CT, 1976Sunday Runners in the Rain,1976The Former One-on-One Basketball Champion,Actors Studio, New YorkCity, 1977; published withThe Great Labor Day Classic,Dramatists Play Service, 1982, and inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996(Adaptor) Eugene Ionesco'sMan with Bags,translated by Marie-France Ionesco, Towson State University Theatre, Towson, MD, 1977; published by Grove Press (New York City), 1977The Lounge Player,New York City, 1977(With David Boorstin)Cappella(adaption of his novel of the sametitle), Off-Center Theatre, New York City, 1978Stage Directions,Actors Studio, 1978; published inIsrael Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith &Kraus, 1996The Widow's Blind Date,New York City, 1978; published by TheatreCommunications Group (New York City), 1981, and inNew England Blue: Playsof Working-Class Life,Smith & Kraus, 1996Mackerel,Gloucester Stage Company, Hartford, CT, 1978; publishedby Talonbooks Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 1979A Christmas Carol, Scrooge and Marley(based on the novelA Christmas Carolby Charles Dickens), Baltimore, MD, 1978; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1979The Good Parts,produced at Actors Studio, New York City, 1979; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1983The Great Labor Day Classic,inHolidays,Louisville, KY, 1979, then alone, New York City, 1984; published withThe Former One-on-OneBasketball Champion,New Dramatists Play Service, 1982A Trilogy(also known asGrowing UpandThe Sault Ste. Marie Trilogy;based on material by Morley Torgov; containsThe ChopinPlayoffs,A Rosen by Any Other Name,andToday, I Am a FountainPen), American Jewish Theatre, New York City, 1985-1986;The Chopin Playoffspublished by Dramatists Play Service, 1987;Today, I Am a Fountain Pen(also known asIsrael Horovitz's Today, I Am a Fountain Pen) published by Dramatists Play Service, 1987;A Rosen by Any Other Namepublished by Dramatists Play Service, 1987Henry Lumper,Gloucester, MA, 1985, then Actors Outlet Theatre, New York City, 1989; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1990, and inNewEngland Blue: Plays of Working-Class Life,Smith & Kraus, 1996North Shore Fish,Workshop of the Performing Arts Theatre, 1985-1986; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1989, and inNew England Blue: Plays of Working-Class Life,Smith & Kraus, 1996Year of the Duck,Portland, ME, 1986, then Hudson Guild Theatre, New York City, 1987; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1988"Faith,"Faith, Hope, and Charity,South Street Theatre, New YorkCity, 1988-1989; published by Dramatists Play Service, 1989, and inIsraelHorovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays,Smith & Kraus, 1996Strong-Man's Weak Child,Los Angeles, 1990; published inNew England Blue: Plays of Working-Class Life,Smith & Kraus, 1996Park Your Car in Harvard Yard,Music Box Theatre, New York City, 1991-1992; published asIsrael Horovitz's Park Your Car in Harvard Yard,Samuel French (New York City), 1993, and inNew England Blue: Plays of Working-Class Life,Smith & Kraus, 1996Fighting over Beverley,Gloucester, MA, 1993Green-Eyed Monster,1993Unexpected Tenderness,Workshop of the Performing Arts Theatre, 1994; published inNew England Blue: Plays of Working-Class Life,Smith& Kraus, 1996Barking Sharks,1995Lebenstraum,Gloucester Stage Company, 1996, then New York City, 1997My Old Lady,Gloucester Stage Company, 1996, then New York City, 1997One Under,Gloucester Stage Company, 1997Captains and Courage(based onCaptains Courageousby Rudyard Kipling), 1997Stations of the Cross,Gloucester Stage Company, Gorton Theatre, Gloucester, MA, 1998Fast Hands,1999Also author ofThe Lounge Player.Horovitz's plays have been translated into as many as thirty languages and have been produced in several cities throughout the world.Play CollectionsFirst Season(containsThe Indian Wants the Bronx,It'sCalled the Sugar Plum,andRats), Vintage Books (New York City), 1968An Israel Horovitz Trilogy,Doubleday (Garden City, NY), 1987Israel Horovitz: Collected Works,Volume I:Sixteen Short Plays(also known asWorks;containsAcrobats,Faith,The Former One-on-One Basketball Champion,The Great Labor Day Classic,The Honest-to-God Schnozzola,Hopscotch,The Indian Wants the Bronx,It's Called the Sugar Plum,Line,Morning,Play for Germs,Rats,The 75th,The Shooting Gallery,Spared,andStage Directions), Smith & Kraus (Lyme, NH), 1994New England Blue: Plays of Working-Class Life(containsHenry Lumper,North Shore Fish,Park Your Car in Harvard Yard,Strong Man's Weak Child,Unexpected Tenderness,andThe Widow'sBlind Date), Smith & Kraus, 1996Plays represented in anthologies, includingCollision Course,edited by Edward Parone, Random House (New York City), 1968;The Waterford Plays,edited by John Lahr, Grove (New York City), 1968;The Best Short Plays,edited by Stanley Richards, Chilton, 1968-1970, 1975, 1977-78; andFamous American Plays of the 1960s,edited by Harold Clurman, Dell (New York City), 1972.