answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer
User Avatar

Wiki User

10y ago
This answer is:
User Avatar

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: What cases resulted in a supreme court ruling that granted congress broad powers over interstate commerce?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Continue Learning about American Government

What do congress do under the expressed powers granted to it by the constitution?

regulate interstate trade


How did each of john marshall's 3 landmark decisions change the power of the supreme court?

Gibbons v. Ogden was the landmark decision which Supreme Court held that the power to regulate interstate commerce was actually granted to the Congress by Commerce Clause in Article I of the Constitution.


Can Congress regulate trade with other nations?

The Constitution authorizes Congress to regulate trade:with foreign nationsbetween stateswith "Indian Tribes" (Native American Nations)These are among the expressed powers of Congress under the Interstate Commerce Clause (Article I, Section 8, Clause 3).


Particular powers of the congress that are listed in article 1 are often called the?

enumerated powers. These are the powers specifically granted to Congress by the Constitution, such as the power to tax, regulate commerce, or declare war.


Has the National government abused its powers in its relations with the states?

Absolutely. In almost every aspect. For example: The interstate commerce clause is used as a catch-all for almost any legislation the federal government wants to enact. Take the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms. They are granted their powers from the interstate commerce clause. The reasoning is that guns are bought and sold in interstate commerce. So, If this is a good reason to form an entire beurocratic entity, why do we not have a Bureau of Apples, Tennis Rackets, and Doorknobs? After all, aren't these things also sold interstate? Why is there justification for one because of the "catch-all" of interstate commerce, but not any other item that is also sold interstate? Just one of hundreds of examples of the federal government abusing It's powers.

Related questions

Would Congress make laws on trading?

Congress has the duty and the right to make the laws on trading. Congress was specifically granted the power over interstate commerce.


What is a example of judicial restraint?

One example of judicial restraint is Gibbons vs. Ogden. In this case, the Supreme Court held that the power to regulate interstate commerce was granted to Congress by the Commerce Clause of the Constitution. This is seen to be an example of judicial restraint because it restrained its power within congress to regulate interstate commerce and they were not exercising their power outside of any law or ruling. They found no violation in the Constitution from this case.


What can Congress do under the expressed powers granted to it by the US Constitution?

Regulate interstate trade.


What do congress do under the expressed powers granted to it by the constitution?

regulate interstate trade


How did each of john marshall's 3 landmark decisions change the power of the supreme court?

Gibbons v. Ogden was the landmark decision which Supreme Court held that the power to regulate interstate commerce was actually granted to the Congress by Commerce Clause in Article I of the Constitution.


The first substantial effort by congress to regulate the affairs of business resulted in?

the passage of the Sherman Antitrust Act in 1890. This legislation was aimed at preventing and restricting monopolistic practices that stifled competition and harmed consumers. It granted the federal government the power to investigate and prosecute companies engaged in anti-competitive behavior.


What does the word commerce mean?

The Commerce Compromise granted the U.S. Congress the right to levy taxes on imports, but not exports.


Why is the government set forth in the constitution called a federal system?

granted the federal government control over interstate commerce.


Can Congress regulate trade with other nations?

The Constitution authorizes Congress to regulate trade:with foreign nationsbetween stateswith "Indian Tribes" (Native American Nations)These are among the expressed powers of Congress under the Interstate Commerce Clause (Article I, Section 8, Clause 3).


Why is the commerce clause so important?

The "Commerce Clause," Article I, Section 8, Clause 3, of the United States Constitution arguably is important because it is the means by which Congress is able to legislate in areas that would otherwise be left to the States to decide. In the U.S. federal system, any powers not granted to the federal government are reserved by the States. For example, there is no Constitutional grant of power to Congress to regulate the issuance and registration of securities. Regulating the securities industry, therefore, was left to the various States to determine. Where, then, does the authority lie for the Securities and Exchange Commission to regulate the public markets? The answer lies in the Commerce Clause. It allows Congress to "regulate commerce... among the several states." Accordingly, as soon as a company in Virginia offers shares of its stock for sale to a person in North Carolina, "interstate commerce" has occurred and Congress is empowered to regulate that commerce. Congress thus passed the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 on the authority that it was regulating interstate commerce. Note that, in general, those laws do not apply to offerings of securities made wholly within a single state. For example, a company in Roanoke, VA, selling its shares of stock to a person in Stafford, VA, would not be subject to the federal securities laws if no one outside of Virginia purchased those share. An Internet search of this topic will uncover a laundry-list of instances by which Congress has invoked the Commerce Clause to regulate in areas in which it was not explicitly granted authority.


Why is the commerce so important?

The "Commerce Clause," Article I, Section 8, Clause 3, of the United States Constitution arguably is important because it is the means by which Congress is able to legislate in areas that would otherwise be left to the States to decide. In the U.S. federal system, any powers not granted to the federal government are reserved by the States. For example, there is no Constitutional grant of power to Congress to regulate the issuance and registration of securities. Regulating the securities industry, therefore, was left to the various States to determine. Where, then, does the authority lie for the Securities and Exchange Commission to regulate the public markets? The answer lies in the Commerce Clause. It allows Congress to "regulate commerce... among the several states." Accordingly, as soon as a company in Virginia offers shares of its stock for sale to a person in North Carolina, "interstate commerce" has occurred and Congress is empowered to regulate that commerce. Congress thus passed the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 on the authority that it was regulating interstate commerce. Note that, in general, those laws do not apply to offerings of securities made wholly within a single state. For example, a company in Roanoke, VA, selling its shares of stock to a person in Stafford, VA, would not be subject to the federal securities laws if no one outside of Virginia purchased those share. An internet search of this topic will uncover a laundry-list of instances by which Congress has invoked the Commerce Clause to regulate in areas in which it was not explicitly granted authority.


What does interstate cooperation mean?

Interstate cooperation is any power not granted to the federal government.