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Article III, Section 1 says the justices of the Supreme Court, "shall hold their offices during good behavior." This phrase has been interpreted to mean justices and judges are afforded a lifetime commission that can only be revoked (by impeachment and conviction) if the justice fails to act with integrity or commits another impeachable offense, as outlined in Article II, Section 4:

"Section 4. The President, Vice President and all civil officers of the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors."

According to Jon Roland of the Constitution Society, "high crimes and misdemeanors" refers not only to statutory violations, but to "the full range of offenses against the Constitution and against the rights of persons. . ."

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Q: What does 'during good behavior' mean relative to a US Supreme Court justice?
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Do US Supreme Court justices serve six-year terms?

No. Article III of the US Constitution states that judges and justices in the federal Judicial Branch serve "during good behavior," meaning they receive a lifetime appointment that can only be revoked if the justice commits an impeachable offense. A Supreme Court justice may be removed from the bench involuntarily if he or she is impeached by the US House of Representatives and convicted at trial in the Senate.


Who was the US Supreme Court Chief Justice during and after the War of 1812?

Chief Justice John Marshall presided over the US Supreme Court during the War of 1812.President Adams appointed John Marshall in 1801; he served until his death in 1835.


Who or what is the head of the Judicial Branch of the US government?

The Supreme Court of the United States, as an institution, is head of the Judicial branch of government. The Chief Justice of the United States (colloquially known as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court) leads during his tenure.Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., has presided over the US Supreme Court since 2005.


Who is the head of the judicial branch?

The Supreme Court of the United States, as an institution, is head of the Judicial branch of government. The Chief Justice of the United States (colloquially known as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court) leads during his tenure.The current Chief Justice is John G. Roberts, Jr., who has lead the Court since 2005.The judicial branch of the government is headed by Congress.


Judges hold office during good behavior?

Some do. That's what the constitution says about the Supreme Court justices, for example.

Related questions

What is the tenure of office of the chief justice of the supreme court?

The US constitution provides that justices of the supreme court, including the chief justice, shall hold their offices "during good behavior," which basically means "until they die or retire." Theoretically a justice could be impeached, but this has only happened once in US history (to Justice Samuel Chase in 1804), and he was acquitted by the Senate.


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Do US Supreme Court justices serve six-year terms?

No. Article III of the US Constitution states that judges and justices in the federal Judicial Branch serve "during good behavior," meaning they receive a lifetime appointment that can only be revoked if the justice commits an impeachable offense. A Supreme Court justice may be removed from the bench involuntarily if he or she is impeached by the US House of Representatives and convicted at trial in the Senate.


What are the rules of conduct for the Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court?

There are no formal rules of conduct specific to the Chief Justice. Article III of the Constitution, which addresses the Judicial Branch of government, states justices hold their positions during "good behavior," meaning as long as they don't commit impeachable offenses.


Who was the US Supreme Court Chief Justice during and after the War of 1812?

Chief Justice John Marshall presided over the US Supreme Court during the War of 1812.President Adams appointed John Marshall in 1801; he served until his death in 1835.


Who is the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court during the case of Gibbons vs Ogden?

John Marshall was the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court during the Gibbons vs Ogden Case. This landmark decision invoked that the power to regulate interstate trade was granted via the constitution.


What is the tenure in office of the supreme court?

According to the most recent statistics, the average tenure of a US Supreme Court justice is currently 25.5 years.


During the 2009 term of the US Supreme Court which Justice voted with the majority most often?

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What former supreme court justice rode the rails during the Great Depression?

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Are US Supreme Court justices appointed?

Yes, US Supreme Court justices are appointed, rather than elected. The President nominates a candidate, and the Senate votes whether to confirm or reject the appointment. If a simple majority of Senators (51%) support the President's choice, then the person is appointed to the Supreme Court. The Constitution provides the justice shall serve "during good behavior," which means the appointment is for life, unless the justice commits an impeachable offense.