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Fifty-one percent (51%) of the Senators votingmust approve the President's nomination in order to appoint a justice to the US Supreme Court. Approval depends on a simple majority vote, but does not require the full Senate to be present.

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13y ago
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13y ago

Under normal circumstances, approval can be accomplished by a simple majority (51%) of the Senators voting. If, for some reason, a Senator decides to filibuster the nomination, the Senate must first invoke cloture, which requires 60 votes (three-fifths of the Senate).

Justice Abe Fortas was prevented from succeeding Earl Warren as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court because the Senate couldn't muster enough votes to break a filibuster (but it required more votes back then).

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14y ago

51%, not to be confused with 51 votes. US Supreme Court justices only require approval from a simple majority of the Senators voting, which is usually less than the full Senate.

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Q: What percent is of the Senate is required to appoint a President's nominee to the US Supreme Court?
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Continue Learning about American Government

The president can appoint a nominee to the Supreme Court with the approval of the?

Senate. The Senate must give a majority vote to approve a Supreme Court nominee.


Who holds the power to appoint Supreme Courts Justices?

The President, but he (or she) must have the consent of the Senate, which votes whether to accept or reject the nominee. If a simple majority (51% of those voting) affirms the President's choice, the nominee is appointed and becomes a US Supreme Court justice


What is related to the members of the us senate voting on a nominee to the is supreme court?

Checks and balances


What happens if a Senator is appointed as a justice to the US Supreme Court?

If a senator were to leave the senate in order to serve on the Supreme Court, the governnor of his or her state would appoint a new senator to complete the remaining portion of the senatorial term of office.


How are appointments made to the Supreme Court?

AnswerThe President nominates new members to the Supreme Court, but the Senate must approve the nomination by a majority vote. This is part of the system of checks and balances that is supposed to prevent abuse of power.ExplanationWhen there is a vacancy on the bench the President (Executive branch) nominates a person to be a Supreme Court justice. Usually, the President receives recommendations from trusted advisors, or may have someone in mind whom an earlier President appointed to a US Court of Appeals Circuit Court to gain judicial experience.The FBI investigates the nominee's background and returns a report to the Senate Judiciary Committee. The Committee considers the candidate's judicial and personal record to determine suitability for office, then holds a hearing to question him or her about judicial record, political philosophy, ideology, and anything else they find appropriate. The Committee discusses the findings and may follow-up with addition written questions.When the Committee is satisfied they have enough information to make a recommendation, they vote to decide whether to send the vote to the floor with a recommendation that the full Senate vote for or against commissioning the nominee. Occasionally, if the Committee is split in its opinion, they may send the vote to the floor with no recommendation.The full Senate may hold its own hearing, which generally lasts less than a week, where they may also question the candidate before voting. If the nominee receives a simple majority of 51 votes, he or she officially becomes a Supreme Court Justice.If the Senate rejects the nominee, the President will pick another nominee or may nominate the same person for additional review. This authority comes from Article II, Section 2 of the US Constitution, which states that the President has the power to nominate, and by and with the consent of the Senate, appoint Judges of the Supreme Court. Thus the President nominates but does not appoint Justices of of the Supreme Court. Actual appointment occurs only after Senate confirmation.For more information, see Related Questions, below.

Related questions

The president can appoint a nominee to the Supreme Court with the approval of the?

Senate. The Senate must give a majority vote to approve a Supreme Court nominee.


Who holds the power to appoint Supreme Courts Justices?

The President, but he (or she) must have the consent of the Senate, which votes whether to accept or reject the nominee. If a simple majority (51% of those voting) affirms the President's choice, the nominee is appointed and becomes a US Supreme Court justice


Why should one appoint a nominee?

One should appoint a nominee in case if the policy holder dies during hospitalization in non-network hospital, his/her nominee can process a claim and entitled to get reimbursement from the insurer. So it is strongly advised to appoint a nominee at the time of buying health insurance.


Why does the president appoint officials?

Presidents are Constitutionally allowed to appoint certain official jobs without Congressional oversight. This is both a privilege to the Executive branch, but also a matter of expediency -- as confirming every political nominee would be enormously time consuming.


Who approves Supreme Court nominee?

us senate


Who approves the nominee to the US Supreme Court?

us senate


Who approved a nominee to the U.S. Supreme court?

us senate


What do you think influences a president's choice for a supreme court justice?

In the US, presidential nominations to the US Supreme Court are judges that share many of the presidents' beliefs about politics and government. The nominee, however, normally is balanced towards the middle of the political spectrum in order to keep the Court less political. Also, a nominee's past court decisions in lower courts are examined by the nominating president to see if the decisions have not been too extreme.


What is the practices of presidents seeking the approval of certain senators before submitting a nominee for a federal judgeship to the Senate as a whole?

_____? is the practices of presidents seeking the approval of certain senators before submitting a nominee for a federal judgeship to the Senate as a whole


What Justices did President James Buchanan appoint to the US Supreme Court?

Buchanan successfully appointed only one Supreme Court Justice - Nathan Clifford of Maine in 1858. He also appointed Jeremiah S Black of Pennsylvania in 1861, but this nominee was rejected by one vote (26-25) the Senate, due to the departure of southern Democrats following the secession of their states.


What is related to the members of the us senate voting on a nominee to the is supreme court?

Checks and balances


Which Supreme Court nominee was the center of controversy during his nomination hearings on the grounds of sexual harassment?

Also in 1991, the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas became the center of a controversial firestorm related to a sexual harassment charge.