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It required northerners to help recapture runaway slaves which was disliked either on moral grounds as it was for abolitionists but also in some reasons of fear of a Slave Power Conspiracy with the Southern Slaves States holding greater power over Congress than the North, many northerners in the mid 1800s believed many of the politicians in power were under the thumb of Southerners. This act in particular placed fines on people who would not cooperate and jail terms on people who helped fugitives escape. Also, southern slave catchers (aka federal marshals) roamed the North, sometimes capturing free African Americans with little regard for if they were free or fugitive slaves.

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2009-03-13 09:36:37
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Q: Why did many northerners object the fugitive slave law?
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Why did many northerners dislike the fugitive slave law act?

Since the fugitive slave law enforced the capture of slaves, and the northerners were against slavery, the northerners disliked it


How was the fugitive slave act started?

== == The Fugitive Slave Law required Northern citizens to help catch escaped slaves. But many Northerners hated the law as much as they hated slavery. They ignored it from the time it was passed by Congress. In this way, the Fugitive Slave Law increased the tension between Northerners and Southerners.


How did many northerners react to the provisions of the fugitive slave act of 1850?

they decided to help the fugitives by being a slave free place


What were the effects of the Fugitive Slave Act?

The Fugitive Slave Act forced many people to consider the pros and cons of slavery in the United States. The effect of the Fugitive Slave Act was the freeing of slaves.


What were the effects of the fugitive slave acts?

The Fugitive Slave Act forced many people to consider the pros and cons of slavery in the United States. The effect of the Fugitive Slave Act was the freeing of slaves.


What effect did Uncle Tom's Cabin have on the slave debate?

It recruited many more Northerners to the cause of Abolitionism, and encouraged the operating of the Underground Railroad - the safe-house system that smuggled fugitive slaves into Canada.


What were the effects of the fugitive act?

The Fugitive Slave Act forced many people to consider the pros and cons of slavery in the United States. The effect of the Fugitive Slave Act was the freeing of slaves.


What did many northerners ignore when they were assisting fugitive slaves?

The risk of heavy fines or jail for not reporting runaways.


What were the effects of the fugitives slave act?

The Fugitive Slave Act forced many people to consider the pros and cons of slavery in the United States. The effect of the Fugitive Slave Act was the freeing of slaves.


What is the Fugitive slave act of 1850 and what was the significance of the act?

Under the Fugitive Slave Law, any person arrested as a runaway slave had almost no legal rights. Many runaways fled to Canada rather than risk being caught and sent back to their master. The Fugitive Slave Law also said that any person who helped a slave escape, or even refused to aid slave catchers, could be jailed. Both sides were unhappy with the Fugitive Slave Law, though for for different reasons. Northerners did not want to enforce the law. Southerners felt the law did not do enough to ensure the return of their escaped property (slaves; slaves were considered property). Hope this helps! Source: History Alive! The United States Through Industrialism Textbook (TCI)


What impact did the Compromise of 1850 and the Fugitive Slave Act have on Americans?

The Fugitive Slave Act was meant to make the South feel better about the Compromise of 1850, which did not offer them much else. In fact, its main impact was on the North, where the general public strongly resented being treated like unpaid slave-catchers, and 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' was written as a protest against the Act.


CA enters as a free state?

Yes. The enormous new territory of California was to be a free-soil state. To get this agreed in Congress, the South had to be appeased with the tightening-up of the Fugitive Slave Act, which caused many Northerners to sympathise with the runaways.

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