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While a direct democracy may sound well and good, there are several problems. First, important decisions that need to be made quickly are bogged down when collecting votes; unless there is a fast-acting legislative body or executive power, issues such as national defense can be severely hampered by waiting for votes on an issue. Second, the general public is often uneducated and unfamiliar with political decisions and their aftermath; having a direct democracy would be like having everyone fix their own pipes, rather than just paying a plumber. Third, the creation of legislation would be infeasible; how can you have an entire nation write a bill? Fourth, requiring citizens to vote on day-to-day decisions and administrative actions would take up too much time; and, those who were more politically active or had more time on their hands would have more say than those who either didn't frequently vote on issues or were too busy to bother.

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14y ago
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9y ago

It would have been impossible for every American to vote on every possible law. Too many people and too much time would have been spent on voting.

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13y ago

Because the rich prick people governing us think that the common person is to stupid to decide who leads them

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Q: Why didn't the US establish a direct democracy?
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