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There are three layers in a Roman road with each layer being laid with progressively larger stone. The top layer could be resurfaced when repair was needed. The roads were also higher in the center to allow for proper drainage.

There are three layers in a Roman road with each layer being laid with progressively larger stone. The top layer could be resurfaced when repair was needed. The roads were also higher in the center to allow for proper drainage.

There are three layers in a Roman road with each layer being laid with progressively larger stone. The top layer could be resurfaced when repair was needed. The roads were also higher in the center to allow for proper drainage.

There are three layers in a Roman road with each layer being laid with progressively larger stone. The top layer could be resurfaced when repair was needed. The roads were also higher in the center to allow for proper drainage.

There are three layers in a Roman road with each layer being laid with progressively larger stone. The top layer could be resurfaced when repair was needed. The roads were also higher in the center to allow for proper drainage.

There are three layers in a Roman road with each layer being laid with progressively larger stone. The top layer could be resurfaced when repair was needed. The roads were also higher in the center to allow for proper drainage.

There are three layers in a Roman road with each layer being laid with progressively larger stone. The top layer could be resurfaced when repair was needed. The roads were also higher in the center to allow for proper drainage.

There are three layers in a Roman road with each layer being laid with progressively larger stone. The top layer could be resurfaced when repair was needed. The roads were also higher in the center to allow for proper drainage.

There are three layers in a Roman road with each layer being laid with progressively larger stone. The top layer could be resurfaced when repair was needed. The roads were also higher in the center to allow for proper drainage.

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13y ago
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12y ago

After digging down to the prescribed depth, the earth was leveled and pounded tight. The first layer was called the "statumen" which was of stones "of the size to fill the hand". This was covered by the second layer called the "audits" a concrete of broken stones and line. Over this was the "nucleus", a bedding layer of fine cement made with pounded potsherds and line. On top of this was the crown of the road, the "dorsum" which was made of paving stones which were slightly raised in the center so the rain water would run off.

After digging down to the prescribed depth, the earth was leveled and pounded tight. The first layer was called the "statumen" which was of stones "of the size to fill the hand". This was covered by the second layer called the "audits" a concrete of broken stones and line. Over this was the "nucleus", a bedding layer of fine cement made with pounded potsherds and line. On top of this was the crown of the road, the "dorsum" which was made of paving stones which were slightly raised in the center so the rain water would run off.

After digging down to the prescribed depth, the earth was leveled and pounded tight. The first layer was called the "statumen" which was of stones "of the size to fill the hand". This was covered by the second layer called the "audits" a concrete of broken stones and line. Over this was the "nucleus", a bedding layer of fine cement made with pounded potsherds and line. On top of this was the crown of the road, the "dorsum" which was made of paving stones which were slightly raised in the center so the rain water would run off.

After digging down to the prescribed depth, the earth was leveled and pounded tight. The first layer was called the "statumen" which was of stones "of the size to fill the hand". This was covered by the second layer called the "audits" a concrete of broken stones and line. Over this was the "nucleus", a bedding layer of fine cement made with pounded potsherds and line. On top of this was the crown of the road, the "dorsum" which was made of paving stones which were slightly raised in the center so the rain water would run off.

After digging down to the prescribed depth, the earth was leveled and pounded tight. The first layer was called the "statumen" which was of stones "of the size to fill the hand". This was covered by the second layer called the "audits" a concrete of broken stones and line. Over this was the "nucleus", a bedding layer of fine cement made with pounded potsherds and line. On top of this was the crown of the road, the "dorsum" which was made of paving stones which were slightly raised in the center so the rain water would run off.

After digging down to the prescribed depth, the earth was leveled and pounded tight. The first layer was called the "statumen" which was of stones "of the size to fill the hand". This was covered by the second layer called the "audits" a concrete of broken stones and line. Over this was the "nucleus", a bedding layer of fine cement made with pounded potsherds and line. On top of this was the crown of the road, the "dorsum" which was made of paving stones which were slightly raised in the center so the rain water would run off.

After digging down to the prescribed depth, the earth was leveled and pounded tight. The first layer was called the "statumen" which was of stones "of the size to fill the hand". This was covered by the second layer called the "audits" a concrete of broken stones and line. Over this was the "nucleus", a bedding layer of fine cement made with pounded potsherds and line. On top of this was the crown of the road, the "dorsum" which was made of paving stones which were slightly raised in the center so the rain water would run off.

After digging down to the prescribed depth, the earth was leveled and pounded tight. The first layer was called the "statumen" which was of stones "of the size to fill the hand". This was covered by the second layer called the "audits" a concrete of broken stones and line. Over this was the "nucleus", a bedding layer of fine cement made with pounded potsherds and line. On top of this was the crown of the road, the "dorsum" which was made of paving stones which were slightly raised in the center so the rain water would run off.

After digging down to the prescribed depth, the earth was leveled and pounded tight. The first layer was called the "statumen" which was of stones "of the size to fill the hand". This was covered by the second layer called the "audits" a concrete of broken stones and line. Over this was the "nucleus", a bedding layer of fine cement made with pounded potsherds and line. On top of this was the crown of the road, the "dorsum" which was made of paving stones which were slightly raised in the center so the rain water would run off.

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12y ago

After digging down to the prescribed depth, the earth was leveled and pounded tight. The first layer was called the "statumen" which was of stones "of the size to fill the hand". This was covered by the second layer called the "audits" a concrete of broken stones and line. Over this was the "nucleus", a bedding layer of fine cement made with pounded potsherds and line. On top of this was the crown of the road, the "dorsum" which was made of paving stones which were slightly raised in the center so the rain water would run off.

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13y ago

There are three layers in a Roman road with each layer being laid with progressively larger stone. The top layer could be resurfaced when repair was needed. The roads were also higher in the center to allow for proper drainage.

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10y ago

The number of layers that a road has usually depends with the type of road.

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