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As an early Baby Boomer (born three years after World War II) I can say that life was wonderful! At age four, my friends and I went to the park and played without any parental supervision, because violent crime and missing children were virtually unheard of. (And this was only 15 miles from New York City!) My Dad worked in construction and when I was five or six he'd sometimes bring me to work with him. The post-War building boom was in full swing and developers were putting up hundreds of houses at a time. The workers stayed in one neighborhood at a time, moving from house to house down the row each day.

Since there were few working moms and no daycare, neighborhoods were filled with kids and playmates were found in abundance. As we grew up and learned to ride bicycles, our area of adventure expanded. Again, parents didn't worry, so long as you came home in time for supper, because back then, families ate TOGETHER and mealtime was an important event. There were a FEW organized activities for kids, like little league and scouts, but they were scheduled so as not to interfere with family life. You didn't have parents taking three kids to three different activities the same evening and feeding everyone fast food. (In fact, very little "fast food" existed, except for Dairy Queen, and people only went there for an ice cream cone.) Home cooked meals from scratch were the order of the day, and activities played a secondary role in family life.

Families did things together, and often went for rides in the car on summer evenings or on Sunday afternoons. Though friends were in abundance, doing things with brothers, sisters, and parents was also important. Family outings to the beach on summer weekends were common.

Almost anyone who wanted to work could find a job in the late 40s, all through the 50s, and into the early 60s. Since few women worked, jobs were in abundance and men not only could find a good-paying job, but it was enough to support a family on, including owning one's own home and a late-model car. And college degrees were unnecessary for most jobs. Someone with a high school diploma could start at the bottom and within five-10 years, become a manager with a substantial income. But even people with good incomes lived modestly back then. Even doctors and lawyers rarely lived in houses that were more than 2,000 sq ft. Conspicuous displays of consumption were frowned upon and the middle class seemed larger than it is today, with fewer obviously affluent or obviously poor people in evidence.

Marriages back then tended to last, and single parents were a rarity. The three bedroom suburban home with 3.5 children was more a reality than a cliché. Kids had old fashioned names like Billy, John, Kathleen, and Ellen instead of novelty names like Taylor and Madison, perhaps reflecting more old-fashioned values.

Then along came the Vietnam War era, social protests, and all sorts of social revolutions. Life was never the same, or - in my opinion - as good. I'm glad I grew up when I did, and sorry my grandchildren will not know the same kind of world.

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15y ago
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13y ago

scared it would happen again and sad for loved ones!:(

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10y ago

i was taking this test and had to do a lot of reading and searching but i found the answer (yay me lol) ANSWER: Many wanted the U.S. to retreat from global responsibilities.

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12y ago

that America's national security involved world security

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Anonymous

Lvl 1
4y ago

Many believed that the ending of this war was the beginning of peace. Many referred to it as “the war to end all wars” and it was believed to be the last war by many people

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Q: After the World War 2 how did Americans view the role of the US?
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