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It was lots of Jews who chose to fight there Nazi oppresors. They did this by fighting with smuggled weapons, spiritual resistance, sabotaging Nazi operations and many other things. They also helped in actual fights between the Allies and Axis in battles. There was the Jewish Brigade in the British Army. There were Jewish Partisans that hid in forests and tried to rescue Jews from the camps like Aushwitz and other camps.

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14y ago
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15y ago

There was none. _______ In Western Europe and Germany there was practically no Jewish resistance to the Nazis. The Jews were too scattered and assimilated for resistance. In Eastern Europe there was the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising (see link); there were the revolts and mass breakouts at Sobibor and Treblinka and various smaller acts of resistance. In Poland and Belarus there were active Jewish Resistance groups.

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11y ago

There was no 'Jewish resistance' to the Nuremberg Laws.

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Q: What was Jewish resistance to the Nuremberg laws?
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What behaviors was made illegal under Germany's Nuremberg Laws?

The answer is... Jews marrying non-jewish Germans.


Why did the Nazis feel the Nuremberg laws were necessary?

The Nuremberg Laws of 1935 were antisemitic laws in Nazi Germany which were introduced at the annual Nazi Party rally in Nuremberg. The laws classified people as German if all four of their grandparents were of "German or kindred blood", while people were classified as Jews if they descended from three or four Jewish grandparents. A person with one or two Jewish grandparents was a Mischling, a crossbreed, of "mixed blood".The Nuremberg Laws deprived Jews of citizenship and prohibited marriage between Jews and other Germans.


What were the Nuremberg laws passed by the Nazi in 1935?

1. Reichsflaggengesetz: if one owned a German flag he/she was forced to put the Nazi's symbol on it.2. Civilianity: A German or non-Jew could not marry, or have anyting to do except violence with Jews.3. Blood: If one had any Jewish blood or if one of his/her parents were Jewish he/she could lose their life because of that. If one had German blood or any other but Jewish he had a life.4. If one were out after the curfew, they would die especially if they were Jewish.PS: number four is technically not one of the 3 laws but its was still cruelly important.


Which of the following. Describes an impact of the Nuremberg laws on Germany's Jewish population?

Jews were stripped of their citizenship and banned from marrying German citizens.


Why were the Nuremberg trails significant?

The Nuremberg trials were significant because Nuremberg was the city in Germany where the Nuremberg Laws were created, which deprived Jews of German citizenship. The trials were held in Nuremberg because it was almost like a punishment for the Nazis.

Related questions

What was the resistance to the law?

There was no 'Jewish resistance' to the Nuremberg Laws.


How did the Jewish people show resistance to the Nuremberg laws?

Not happy


What were ther Nuremberg laws?

The Nuremberg Laws were a series of sanctions against the Jewish people.


How did the nuremberg laws of 1935 classify people in germany as jewish by what standard did the government judge if a person was jewish?

The Nuremberg laws determined whether a person was Jewish primarily based on the number of Jewish great-grandparents.


What was the name of the first set of laws that allowed Jewish discrimination?

They were called the Nuremberg Laws. They were so named because the laws came after the annual rally at the city of Nuremberg.


What were the anti-jewish policies before World War 2?

The Nuremberg Laws.


What law took away Jewish freedom in Germany?

There were hundreds of such laws, starting with the Nuremberg Laws of 1935.


Did the Nuremberg Laws take citizenship from Jewish citizens?

The right of citizenry was taken away from the Jews by the Nuremberg laws on citizenship and race.


What were the Nuremberg laws-?

The Nuremberg Laws of 1935 should not be confused with the postwar Nuremberg Tribunal. The Nuremberg Laws (1935) were anti-Semitic laws that took away civil rights and (in effect) citizenship from German Jews. Anyone who had three or four Jewish grandparents was classified as a full Jew, regardless of whether that individual recognized himself or herself as a Jew or belonged to the Jewish religious community. (Those with two Jewish grandparents were classified as "half Jews," and those with one Jewish grandparent were classed as "quarter Jews.") The Nuremberg Laws forbade sex and marriage between Jews and non-Jews. Later, the term "sex" was defined in detail. The laws were drawn up by Wilhelm Stuckart and Hans Globke. There is disagreement among historians as to whether the Nuremberg Laws were, in some sense, "spontaneous" (for example, a reaction to a recent anti-Jewish riot) or whether they had been planned long in advance.


What was the act that took Jewish rights away in World War 2 Germany?

Nuremberg laws


What behaviors was made illegal under Germany's Nuremberg Laws?

The answer is... Jews marrying non-jewish Germans.


What we're Nuremberg laws?

The Nuremberg Laws of 1935 should not be confused with the postwar Nuremberg Tribunal. The Nuremberg Laws (1935) were anti-Semitic laws that took away civil rights and (in effect) citizenship from German Jews. Anyone who had three or four Jewish grandparents was classified as a full Jew, regardless of whether that individual recognized himself or herself as a Jew or belonged to the Jewish religious community. (Those with two Jewish grandparents were classified as "half Jews," and those with one Jewish grandparent were classed as "quarter Jews.") The Nuremberg Laws forbade sex and marriage between Jews and non-Jews. Later, the term "sex" was defined in detail. The laws were drawn up by Wilhelm Stuckart and Hans Globke. There is disagreement among historians as to whether the Nuremberg Laws were, in some sense, "spontaneous" (for example, a reaction to a recent anti-Jewish riot) or whether they had been planned long in advance.