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Answering that would take a Master's thesis, but the short version:The world of 1939 was far more anti-Semitic and uncaring about the plight of victims of brutality, particularly anti-Semitic brutality than it is now. Even powerful media organizations like Time magazine and the Oxford English Dictionary cheerfully printed anti-Semitic information. Time sneered in the 1930s that Albert Einstein "like many Jews, does not exercise." The OED used the word "Jew" as a verb, meaning "to cheat someone."

When the Nazis began their anti-Semitic outbursts, many people in the civilized world did not take them seriously...Hitler's ravings were just more political claptrap, and after a few heads were broken, there would be no more rowdyism. Many other people either publicly or privately applauded the anti-Semitic acts.

Jews were often seen as being either money-grubbing capitalists -- the classic caftaned pawnbroker, squeezing a penny -- or as underhanded and conniving Bolsheviks -- the equally classic long-bearded radical, bomb in hand. The upper Christian crust disliked Jews as socialists and Christ-killers. Joseph Kennedy, the pro-Nazi US Ambassador to England, told Ribbentrop that his pals in Boston admired what the Nazis were doing to the Jews, as there were many clubs that had banned Jews for 50 years. He just wished the Nazis would do it more quietly. Lindbergh blamed World War II on the Jews more directly. In fact, opinion polls in America at the time blamed the Jews for the war.

Anti-Semitism was a standard staple. Colleges and businesses had quotas on admissions and hirings, and glass ceilings. Hotels advertised, "No Hebrews or consumptives taken," or "Guests taken to church free of charge." Housing developments had "restrictive covenants." So when Hitler and his cronies began beating up Jews and killing them, many people across the globe reacted by saying, "Good on you, mate. About time, too."

Would it be allowed to happen today? It's going on right now...Bosnia, Rwanda, the Sudan. There is always money and time for hate.

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I don't think it had much to do with the world being more 'uncaring' in the 1930s and 1940s than now. Once the Holocaust proper (the systematic mass murders) had started in 1941, there was the severely practical problem of how the Holocaust could realistically have been stopped by the Allies ... There was no point in the Allies barking out orders to the German government.

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12y ago
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13y ago
  1. At first the Allies were skeptical about the reports they received.
  2. It was only in about June 1944 that the location of extermination became known.
  3. There was not much that the Allies could have done at that stage.
  4. Ending the Holocaust didn't figure as a priority with the Allies.

Obviously, there were things that the Allies could have done. In particular, they could have called on resistance groups to give a high priority to disrupting the process. There is only one - yes, precisely one - known case of a resistance group stopping a train with prisoners being taken to an extermination camp. The one instance occurred in Belgium and some of the prisoners were freed. (The train was guarded by SS men).

On top of that, what would the Allies have done? Asked Hitler nicely to stop?

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11y ago

Answer 1

With the presence of an influential leader and enough people willing to follow his lead, people can get in to a mob mentality and do things that they in another circumstance would never consider doing. This happened on a huge scale during the Holocaust in Germany. Hitler convinced the German people of his views and told them what they were to do and how they were to do it, and the mentality was one of "everyone is doing it, how could it be wrong".

Commentary on Answer 1

The above answer is based on the mistaken assumption that the Jews were murdered by a howling mob acting in some gigantic riot. In fact, the Holocaust was top secret.

Answer 2

Hitler saw that Mustafa Kemal Ataturk used genocide to claim Asia Minor as his country and rename it Turkey. He murdered 4 million Orthodox Christians: Greeks, Armenians, Georgians, and Assyrians. He also murdered Kurdish Muslims. These people were the majority and the Turks were had a homeland in Turkmenistan in Central Asia were the minority. They had the weapons and they decided to ethnically cleanse the majority. When Hitler saw that they successfully slaughtered 4 million people and no one said anything. Some people actually never knew this happened. Hitler said and I quote "Who remembers the slaughter of the Orthodox people of Asia Minor?" They were the majority while the Jews were the minority. I am happy to say we never forgot the Holocaust. But, I am sad to say no one cares the Holocaust the Turks committed against my people (Armenians).

Answer 3

The sad thing is that on a fundamental level groups of people and nations do not care about other groups and nations unless they can benefit either financially or politically from supporting them. Few politicians are willing to expend resources and political capital to "do the right thing" because "doing the right thing" does not get you elected. Additionally, when you have groups of people like the Jews, Gypsies, Homosexuals, etc. who are maligned by a great majority of the world, it is very hard to get people to empathize. Since the Holocaust of Nazi Germany, there have been numerous slaughterings and genocides of minorities including, but not limited to: Russia's removal of the Caucasus Nations, China's Cultural Revolution, the Rwandan Genocide, the Anfal Campaign, the Genocide Against the Marsh Arabs, Darfurian Genocide, the East Timorese Massacres, etc.

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12y ago

all the governments that neglected to do anything about it while being aware of what was going on... one is America ...Canada ...etc.

The Roosevelt administration.

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The question seems to be based on the misleading assumption that a government outside Germany could have prevented the Holocaust ... It would have taken more than an order from the U.S. and a few marines to prevent it.

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13y ago

Because Hitler was the chancellor, hence he had the power necessary to bring his plan to existence.

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Q: Why was the Holocaust allowed to happen and would it be allowed to happen in modern day society?
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Why do people still talk about the Holocaust today?

The holocaust is relevant because it shows how insidiously modern people can be taken in a manupulated by their leaders into performing unspeakable crimes. We should be vigilent abut this in our own society and make sure the checks and balances and our rights and freedoms aren't being eroded.


What was the hollocust?

The holocaust was the mass murderig of mainly jews but also people like disabled people or homosexual people, they wre put into consentration camps and starved,beaten and made to work, many people died, some went into the rich peoples houses as slaves and could be beaten when ever. The holocaust was lead by Hitler in the 2nd world war there are still survivors of the holocaust today, eg. I know the first soldier who went into Auschwitz as the holocaust ended to help get people out. The holocaust was horrible. You can find out more by just googleing the holocaust hope this helped :)


Who invented the idea of the holocaust?

The first recorded use of the word holocaust in the sense of genocide dates from 1942 but it was rarely used. It is said that Elie Wiesel popularized the word in its modern sense in the late 1950s. However, it didn't become widely used till the late 1970s following the first broadcast of the TV miniseries entitled Holocaust.


What were the effects of Nazism in Europe?

It cannot be doubted that Nazi Germany was the most destructive political regime of the 20th century, not only because it unleashed World War II or instigated the holocaust but because of its impact on German society. The extent of this impact has been extensively debated by various historians, leading to a spectrum of opinions ranging from Marxist perspectives that emphasise a strengthening of class structures within German society, therefore concluding that Nazi Germany had a reactionary impact on Germany society , to that of liberal historians who claim that the modernisation which took place in Nazi Germany, along with a change in 'subjective social reality' is good evidence that a revolution of class and status occurred. General historiographical consensus leans towards the latter of these two arguments, although there is evidence of social continuation throughout the regime. If one concludes that Nazism did have an impact on German society then why were these social changes able to happen? While it is obvious that National Socialists used terror to achieve sIt cannot be doubted that Nazi Germany was the most destructive political regime of the 20th century, not only because it unleashed World War II or instigated the holocaust but because of its impact on German society. The extent of this impact has been extensively debated by various historians, leading to a spectrum of opinions ranging from Marxist perspectives that emphasise a strengthening of class structures within German society, therefore concluding that Nazi Germany had a reactionary impact on Germany society , to that of liberal historians who claim that the modernisation which took place in Nazi Germany, along with a change in 'subjective social reality' is good evidence that a revolution of class and status occurred. General historiographical consensus leans towards the latter of these two arguments, although there is evidence of social continuation throughout the regime. If one concludes that Nazism did have an impact on German society then why were these social changes able to happen? While it is obvious that National Socialists used terror to achieve social policy, the level of support for Nazism was so great that terror alone could not explain the inroads made into wider German society. Propaganda, foreign policy success, the economic recovery of Germany from the Great Depression, as well as Nazism's promise to create an ordered society for the majority of Germans appealed to a vast portion of the German population, who had been traumatised by the 1929-32 economic crisis as well as the contradictions of modern capitalism. Above all else, Nazism was allowed to make inroads into German society by the German public because it was accepted as the best possible political system to meet the needs of security, sensual satisfaction and social aspiration.ocial policy, the level of support for Nazism was so great that terror alone could not explain the inroads made into wider German society. Propaganda, foreign policy success, the economic recovery of Germany from the Great Depression, as well as Nazism's promise to create an ordered society for the majority of Germans appealed to a vast portion of the German population, who had been traumatised by the 1929-32 economic crisis as well as the contradictions of modern capitalism. Above all else, Nazism was allowed to make inroads into German society by the German public because it was accepted as the best possible political system to meet the needs of security, sensual satisfaction and social aspiration.


Is the Final Solution the same thing as the Holocaust?

1. They were the same thing. The word the Holocaust only came into general use around 1980. The Final Solution was the Nazis' own term and was short for Final Solution of the Jewish Question (Endloesung der Judenfrage).___2. The Holocaust also refers to the other programs run to incriminate minorities. Action T4, for example, was an order to exterminate those with disabilities. The Marxists and homosexuals were similarly killed, just not under the title of Final Solution.____Definition 2 is at odds with that used by most professional historians of the Holocaust. See, for example, the definition of the Holocaust provided by Rciahrd J. Evans, Regius Professor of Modern History in the University of Cambridge:'The standard work by the distinguished Canadian historian Michael Marrus, TheHolocaust in History, focused on, to use his own words, 'the Holocaust, the systematic mass murder of European Jewry by the Nazis'. Similarly, Sir Martin Gilbert, in his documentary compilation, The Holocaust: The Jewish Tragedy( London, 1986), concurred in referring to 'the systematic attempt to destroy all European Jewry - an attempt now known as the Holocaust'. Another author, Ronnie S. Landau, put forward a similar definition in his book, The Nazi Holocaust: 'The Holocaust involved the deliberate, systematic murder of approximately 6 million Jews in Nazi-dominated Europe between 1941 and 1945.'Richard J. Evans, Telling Lies About Hitler: The Holocaust, History and the David Irving Trial, Verso, London and New York, 2002, pp. 113-4In the US the term the Holocaust is used loosely, possibly in an attempt to justify Federal funds for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.What Hitler called the 'Final Solution' was (later called) the Holocaust. It involved imprisoning millions of Jewish people, separating the families, experimenting on them surgically with no anaesthetic, and so on. Certain groups of German soldiers were allowed to kill Jews anytime that they saw them, (and they killed a huge number, as well).

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