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The supporters of the United States Constitution wrote a series of essays called the Federalist Paper's which were a series of 85 articles written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay.

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the federalist papers

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Q: In New York the supporters of the Constitution wrote a series of essays called?
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What role did the Federalists play in the debate over the ratification of the Constitution?

The Federalists played an important role in the ratification of the Constitution, because they were the ones that wrote it. Three of them, who were Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, wrote a series of essays arguing why the Constitution should be ratified, by explaining the reason the Constitution was needed so badly, and the reason why it did not take away their liberty (one prevalent argument of those against the ratification of the Constitution, the Anti-federalists). These essays were published in newspapers, and everyone was thinking about the issue from reading them. These essays were put together into a collection called the Federalist Papers. The Federalist Papers are the reason why the Constitution was ratified, other than their compromise to include a Bill of Rights as demanded by the Anti-Federalists.


What did the smaller states fear during the framing of the constitution that led to a series of compromise proposals?

During the framing of the Constitution, smaller states were afraid of not being equally represented. A compromise was to give each state to senators regardless of their size


This series of articles was written in 1787 urging Americans to oppose the ratification of the proposed US Constitution?

anti-federalists wrote the articles in 1787


What were the positions of each side toward ratification?

The debates over ratification of the Constitution represent the most important and intellectually sophisticated public debates in American history. On the one side, the supporters of the Constitution, or "Federalists," argued that the nation desperately needed a stronger national government to bring order, stability and unity to its efforts to find its way in an increasingly complicated world. Opponents of the Constitution, or "Antifederalists," countered that the governments of the states were strong enough to realize the objectives of each state. Any government that diminished the power of the states, as the new Constitution surely promised to do, would also diminish the ability of each state to meet the needs of its citizens. More dramatically, the Antifederalists argued that the new national government, far removed from the people, would be all to quick to compromise their rights and liberties in the name of establishing order and unity.A handful of men on each side of the debate became the central figures in an extensive public discussion about the proposed Constitution, publishing a series of widely-published and carefully read articles explaining their positions. James Madison, Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, writing under the pseudonym Publius, wrote dozens of articles supporting the Constitution which are now collectively referred to as The Federalist Papers. Articles written in response by George Mason, Elbridge Gerry and Patrick Henry are, appropriately, known as the Antifederalist Papers. While these writings are the best known and most widely read today, there were hundreds, even thousands of others who joined in the debates through public argument or speech-making and by writing articles, letters and pamphlets.


What are the three essential parts of a written constitution?

; Article I (1) The Legislative Branch : a long part with 10 sections, creates the Congress to make laws, divides Congress into a Senate and House of Representatives, makes rules for election of members, gives some powers to Congress, limits other powers ; Article II (2) The Executive Branch : sets up the presidency and vice presidency to carry out or execute the laws, election rules, powers of the president, how to impeach ; Article III (3) The Judicial Branch : sets up the Supreme Court, duties and powers of Supreme Court and federal courts, power of judicial review, defines treason ; Article IV (4) The States : creates rules for states to get along with other states, guarantees to states, admitting states to the Union ; Article V (5) Making Amendments : how to add amendments to the Constitution ; Article VI (6) Supreme Law of the Land : the Constitution is the highest law of the land ; Article VII (7) Ratification : the Constitution became effective when 9 out of 13 states approved it ---- Answed by Taylor http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_the_parts_of_a_written_constitution" a).- The civil rigths or constitutional rights.- The rigths and duties for the the aliens visitors, nationals, and citizens. (this rights vary from constitution to constitution). b).- The part of the organical form of the goverment.- The description of the territory, and goverment, (The way and style of goverment, the structure of the branch of the goverment, and the faculties of each branch of goverment). c).- The part of constitutional principles.- Soveregnity, constitutional supremacy and international treaties consideration, way to restore the soveregnity.

Related questions

What is a series of essays favoring the adoption of the constitution?

The Federalist Papers.


James madison alexander hamilton and john jay wrote a series of essays supporting the new constitution called?

The Federalist Papers


What is a series of essays called?

the federlists papers


What is the federalst papers?

a series of 85 articles and essays promoting the ratification of the United States Constitution.


What series of essays was written in support of the constitution?

A collection of essays defending the Constitution can be found in a book entitled "New Federalist Papers: Essays in Defense of the Constitution." It was written by Alan Brinkley, Nelson W. Polsby, and Kathleen M. Sullivan.


What were the series of pro-constitution essays written by James Madison but attributed to publius?

The series of pro-constitution essays written by James Madison but attributed to Publius are collectively known as the Federalist Papers. These essays, along with the contributions of Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, were published between 1787 and 1788 to promote the ratification of the United States Constitution. The Federalist Papers are considered a significant source for understanding the principles and intentions behind the Constitution.


Was Federalists Papers were a series of essays written to promote the ratification of the Constitution?

The Federalist Papers.


Were a series of essays explaining and supporting the constitution?

the federalist papers


What were the Federalist Papers?

One of the most important defenses of the Constitution appeared in a series of essays that became known as the Federalist Papers. These essays supporting the Constitution were written anonymously under the name Publius. They were actually written by Hamilton, Madison, and Jay.


What militiaman advocated for the Constitution through a series of essays that are now called The Federalist Papers?

Alexander Hamilton, future Secretary of the Treasury under George Washington, wrote 52 of the essays. James Madison, future President of the United States, wrote 28 of the essays. John Jay, future first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, wrote 5 of the essays.


What were federalist paper?

One of the most important defenses of the Constitution appeared in a series of essays that became known as the Federalist Papers. These essays supporting the Constitution were written anonymously under the name Publius. They were actually written by Hamilton, Madison, and Jay.


What documents did John Jay Alexander Hamilton and James Madison write to persuade people to adopt a new constitution?

They wrote a series of essays published in New York newspapers collectively called The Federalist Papers. There were 85 essays in total, 50 (or 51) written by Alexander Hamilton, 30 (or 29) written by James Madison, and 5 written by John Jay (who fell ill during the writing). In the early 1800s it was published collectively as one book.