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directed the flow of goods between England Colonies

The Navigation Acts required that all colonial trade be carried in vessels built and owned by English or colonial merchants. The ships had to be manned by crews composed of British seamen. The Acts also required that European nations must sell products to the colonies by first stoping at English ports where they would have to pay a customs duty (tax). The products were checked and then were permitted to travel to the colonies. All products had to go through these ports controlled by England. This made the cost of the product more expensive but protected the trade of Great Britain. Certain materials from the colonies could only be shipped in British or colonial ships and had to be sent to England first. The product was then taxed and allowed to be sent to its destination in whatever European nation. Colonial products could not be shipped directly to any foreign nation.
The Navigation Acts were laws placed by King George III to prohibit trade on overall everything profitable between the 13 colonies and any other country but Great Britain. This helped Great Britain by giving them more and better pick of the goods and products from the 13 colonies that couldn't be found in other countries without competing with other countries for it. However hard this law was enforced, the colonists still found ways to trade slaves, tea, and other goods with some countries in Africa, and with Spain and France as well.
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directed the flow of goods between England Colonies

The Navigation Acts required that all colonial trade be carried in vessels built and owned by English or colonial merchants. The ships had to be manned by crews composed of British seamen. The Acts also required that European nations must sell products to the colonies by first stoping at English ports where they would have to pay a customs duty (tax). The products were checked and then were permitted to travel to the colonies. All products had to go through these ports controlled by England. This made the cost of the product more expensive but protected the trade of Great Britain. Certain materials from the colonies could only be shipped in British or colonial ships and had to be sent to England first. The product was then taxed and allowed to be sent to its destination in whatever European nation. Colonial products could not be shipped directly to any foreign nation.
The Navigation Acts were laws placed by King George III to prohibit trade on overall everything profitable between the 13 colonies and any other country but Great Britain. This helped Great Britain by giving them more and better pick of the goods and products from the 13 colonies that couldn't be found in other countries without competing with other countries for it. However hard this law was enforced, the colonists still found ways to trade slaves, tea, and other goods with some countries in Africa, and with Spain and France as well.
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Q: How did the navigation acts ensure that only England could benefit from trade with the American colonies?
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Continue Learning about American Government

What were the American colonies goals during the American Revolution?

The colonies goals revolved around gaining their freedom from England. This was caused by what the British were doing in their control over the colonies. Overall, they were interested in gaining their freedom, and being able to dictate trade, taxation, and law in a way that it would benefit themselves.</


How did the Navigation Acts benefit England?

The English Navigation Acts were a series of laws which restricted the use of foreign shipping for trade between England (after 1707 Great Britain) and its colonies, which started in 1651. The 1651 Act (like other legislation of the Commonwealth period) was declared void on The Restoration of Charles II, having been passed by 'usurping powers'. Parliament therefore passed new legislation. This is generally referred to as the "Navigation Acts", and (with some amendments) remained in force for nearly two centuries. The Navigation Act 1660 added a twist to Oliver Cromwell's act; ships' crews had to be three-quarters English, and "enumerated" products not produced by the mother country, such as tobacco, cotton, and sugar were to be shipped from the colonies only to England or other English colonies. The Navigation Act 1663 (also called the Act for the Encouragement of Trade) required all European goods bound for America (or other colonies) to be shipped through England first. In England, the goods would be unloaded, inspected, paid duties, and reloaded. The trade had to be carried in English bottoms (i.e. vessels), which included those of its colonies. Furthermore, imports of 'enumerated commodities' (such as sugar, rice, and tobacco) had to be landed and pay tax before going on to other countries. This increased the cost to the colonies, and increased the shipping time. ("England" here includes Wales - though it was little involved in trade to distant parts. After the Act of Union 1707, Scotland enjoyed the same privileges). This Act entitled colonial shipping and seamen to enjoy the full benefits of the exclusive provisions. There was no bar put in the way of colonists who might wish to trade in their own shipping with foreign plantations or European countries other than England, provided they did not violate the enumerated commodity clause.[6] "English bottoms" included vessels built in English plantations (i.e. colonies), for example in America. The Acts were in full force for a short time only. After the Second Anglo-Dutch War, which ended disastrously for England, the Dutch obtained the right to ship commodities produced in their German hinterland to England as if these were Dutch goods. Even more importantly, England conceded the principle of "free ship, free good" which provided freedom of molestation by the Royal Navy of Dutch shipping on the high seas, even in wars in which the Dutch Republic was neutral. This more or less gave the Dutch freedom to conduct their "smuggling" unhindered as long as they were not caught red-handed in territorial waters controlled by England. These provisions were reconfimed in the Treaty of Westminster (1674) after the Third Anglo-Dutch War.


Who pushed parliament to taxes colonies?

The king, the individual governors whole ruled the colonies, and even Parliement themselves. Since the colonists were not allowed to represent themselves per say, those who did represent them, were out for their own benefit.


Why was the declaration of independence written for kids?

It wasn't. It was written for the benefit of the colonies that were to become a nation. The declaration was intended for kids just as much adults within the new nation.


What effects did salutary neglect have on American colonies?

because they felt like it and it was the bestChristinaEngland interfered very little in colonial affairs. Governors rarely enforced the laws. Colonists got used to acting on their own, therefore encouraged growth of self-government and independence. Colonists also established their own legislative bodies to make and enforce their own laws like the Virginia House of Burgesses.

Related questions

Whuch economic benefit did England receive from its north American colonies?

markets and goods to support trade


What colonies were in debt to England through trade?

Great Britain practiced a policy of mercantilism, where its colonies existed solely to benefit the mother country. This aggressive economic policy, coupled with the Navigation Acts which forced the colonies to engage in trade with Britain only, resulted in a massive deficit of the colonies to the British Crown. Up until the beginning of the American Revolution, most, if not all, of the original thirteen colonies were indebted to Great Britain.


What was on benefit the colonies received as a result of the navigation acts passed by parliament?

The acts encouraged shipbuilding.


The first navigation laws were designed to?

The intention of the Navigation Acts was to regulate the trade of the empire and to enable the mother country to derive a profit from colonies. These acts were passed by the British parliament.


What was one benefit the colonies received as a result of the Navigation Acts passed by the Parliament?

The acts encouraged shipbuilding.


What was one benefit the colonies received as a result of the navigation acts pass by parliament?

The acts encouraged shipbuilding.


How did England benefit from mercantilism in the American Colonies?

growing and selling cash crops


Laws passed by English government to control colonial trade for England's own benefit?

Navigation act


Why did the british think that their taxes on the American colonists were fair?

Navigation Acts protected English and Colonial shipsPeople who benefit from the Navigation Act are British citizens all all-British citizens should reap its benefitsActs were designed to protect the Colonials who we're novices when it came to trading with our countries


What was the British view on Mercantilism?

England believed that the colonies were set up for the benefit of England all the products produced in the colonies should go to the mother country (England) were the products would then be sold back to the colonies for really high prices.


English kings granted colonial charters because they believed colonies would?

Benefit england...


How did the ice age glaciers benefit the middle colonies?

glaciers pushed soil from new england to the middle colonies