answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

2025 delegates are needed to win the democratic nomination. However, mre than 40% of the needed delegate are so-called "super delegates". This means they are free to pledge their votes to whomever they please, and don't have to vote for the winner of the given caucus or primary. This "safety valve" was implemented to prevent candidates from fundamentally changing the system.

User Avatar

Wiki User

16y ago
This answer is:
User Avatar
More answers
User Avatar

Wiki User

12y ago

Romney needs 1144 total votes and he currently has 568. He needs 576 more votes to with the republican nomination.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

16y ago

according to CNN the answer 2025 delegates.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

7y ago

1237 for the Republican nomination; 2383 for the Democratic nomination.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

15y ago

1,191 delegates need in 2008

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

12y ago

1144 was the number needed in 2012.

This answer is:
User Avatar

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: How many delegates does a republican candidate need to win the nomination?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Continue Learning about American Government

How many delegates does a Republican need to win the nomination?

A Candidate needs to have a majority of the delegates to win. The race is over if any one candiate gets 1245 delegates, for that means they have slightly over 50% of the delegates and therefor a guarenteed majority.Here is a bunch of info from www.republicansource.comTotal Number of Delegates: 2488The allocation of delegates to the 2008 Republican National Convention, which will be held September 1-4, 2008 in a city to be announced in early 2007, is determined as follows:BASE DELEGATES Each state selects six at-large delegates. American Samoa, Virgin Islands & Guam have four at-large delegates each; Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia have fourteen at-large delegates.DISTRICT DELEGATES Each state also selects three delegates for each member it has in the U.S. House of RepresentativesBONUS DELEGATES Each state can earn additional delegates by meeting one or more of the following requirements: the state cast a majority of its votes for the Republican presidential candidate in the previous presidential election, the state elected Republicans to the U.S. House or Senate, selected a Republican Governor or state legislative majorities, and / or the state holds its presidential primary election after March 15th (this is to discourage states from holding early primaries).Bonus delegates are awarded based on the number of party members elected as Presidential Electors (2004), Governors (2004-2007), House members (2004-2007), Senators (2002-2007), and state legislatures (2004-2007).Republican delegate counts are based on the number of Republicans elected to the State Legislatures, Governors chairs, U.S. House seats, and U.S. Senators seats through 31 December 2007. Republican unpledged delegate counts are determined by state (or equivalent) party rules and assume that the policies of 2004 will apply in 2008.When an individual formally releases delegates already pledged to him or her - a withdrawing candidate must specifically free his/her own delegates to vote for whomever they might choose during the Convention - it is not a requirement for those delegates to vote for another candidate who is endorsed by the withdrawing candidate.However, history has demonstrated that most, if not all, delegates pledged to a candidate who has released them will follow that candidate's lead and vote for the candidate he/she has endorsed. Nevertheless, a withdrawing candidate may not release delegates pledged to him/her so long as the presidential nomination is still undetermined (after all, these delegates can be a valuable bargaining chip for future considerations). Even where a nomination is already determined, a presidential candidate who represents the Party fringe might hold onto his delegates as long as possible in order to get concession.Please refer to the related link for more information.


How many republican delegates does Texas have?

230


What is the process of a presidential primary?

The first step of the presidential election campaign is the announcement of the candidate proclaiming that s/he is going to run for president. In the summer of every presidential election year, political parties in the United States typically conduct national conventions to choose their presidential candidates. At the conventions, the presidential candidates are selected by groups of delegates from each state. After a series of speeches and demonstrations in support of each candidate, the delegates begin to vote, state-by-state, for the candidate of their choice. The first candidate to receive a preset majority number of delegate votes becomes the party's presidential candidate. The candidate selected to run for president then selects a vice presidential candidate. Delegates to the national conventions are selected at the state level, according to rules and formulas determined by each political party's state committee. While these rules and formulas can change from state-to-state and from year-to-year, there remain two methods by which the states choose their delegates to the national conventions: the caucus and the primary.In states holding them, presidential primary elections are open to all registered voters. Just like in general elections, voting is done through a secret ballot. Voters may choose from among all registered candidates and write ins are counted. There are two types of primaries, closed and open. In a closed primary, voters may vote only in the primary of the political party in which they registered. For example, a voter who registered as a Republican can only vote in the Republican primary. In an open primary, registered voters can vote in the primary of either party, but are allowed to vote in only one primary. Most states hold closed primaries. Primary elections also vary in what names appear on their ballots. Most states hold presidential preference primaries, in which the actual presidential candidates' names appear on the ballot. In other states, only the names of convention delegates appear on the ballot. Delegates may state their support for a candidate or declare themselves to be uncommitted. In some states, delegates are bound, or "pledged" to vote for the primary winner in voting at the national convention. In other states some or all delegates are "unpledged," and free to vote for any candidate they wish at the convention. Caucuses are simply meetings, open to all registered voters of the party, at which delegates to the party's national convention are selected. When the caucus begins, the voters in attendance divide themselves into groups according to the candidate they support. The undecided voters congregate into their own group and prepare to be "courted" by supporters of other candidates. Voters in each group are then invited to give speeches supporting their candidate and trying to persuade others to join their group. At the end of the caucus, party organizers count the voters in each candidate's group and calculate how many delegates to the county convention each candidate has won. As in the primaries, the caucus process can produce both pledged and unpledged convention delegates, depending on the party rules of the various states. The Democratic and Republican parties use different methods for determining how many delegates are awarded to, or "pledged" to vote for the various candidates at their national conventions. Democrats use a proportional method. Each candidate is awarded a number of delegates in proportion to their support in the state caucuses or the number of primary votes they won. For example, consider a state with 20 delegates at a democratic convention with three candidates. If candidate "A" received 70% of all caucus and primary votes, candidate "B" 20% and candidate "C" 10%, candidate "A" would get 14 delegates, candidate "B" would get 4 delegates and candidate "C" would get 2 delegates. In the Republican Party, each state chooses either the proportional method or a "winner-take-all" method of awarding delegates. Under the winner-take-all method, the candidate getting the most votes from a state's caucus or primary, gets all of that state's delegates at the national convention. The first step of the presidential election campaign is the announcement of the candidate proclaiming that s/he is going to run for president. In the summer of every presidential election year, political parties in the United States typically conduct national conventions to choose their presidential candidates. At the conventions, the presidential candidates are selected by groups of delegates from each state. After a series of speeches and demonstrations in support of each candidate, the delegates begin to vote, state-by-state, for the candidate of their choice. The first candidate to receive a preset majority number of delegate votes becomes the party's presidential candidate. The candidate selected to run for president then selects a vice presidential candidate. Delegates to the national conventions are selected at the state level, according to rules and formulas determined by each political party's state committee. While these rules and formulas can change from state-to-state and from year-to-year, there remain two methods by which the states choose their delegates to the national conventions: the caucus and the primary.In states holding them, presidential primary elections are open to all registered voters. Just like in general elections, voting is done through a secret ballot. Voters may choose from among all registered candidates and write ins are counted. There are two types of primaries, closed and open. In a closed primary, voters may vote only in the primary of the political party in which they registered. For example, a voter who registered as a Republican can only vote in the Republican primary. In an open primary, registered voters can vote in the primary of either party, but are allowed to vote in only one primary. Most states hold closed primaries. Primary elections also vary in what names appear on their ballots. Most states hold presidential preference primaries, in which the actual presidential candidates' names appear on the ballot. In other states, only the names of convention delegates appear on the ballot. Delegates may state their support for a candidate or declare themselves to be uncommitted. In some states, delegates are bound, or "pledged" to vote for the primary winner in voting at the national convention. In other states some or all delegates are "unpledged," and free to vote for any candidate they wish at the convention. Caucuses are simply meetings, open to all registered voters of the party, at which delegates to the party's national convention are selected. When the caucus begins, the voters in attendance divide themselves into groups according to the candidate they support. The undecided voters congregate into their own group and prepare to be "courted" by supporters of other candidates. Voters in each group are then invited to give speeches supporting their candidate and trying to persuade others to join their group. At the end of the caucus, party organizers count the voters in each candidate's group and calculate how many delegates to the county convention each candidate has won. As in the primaries, the caucus process can produce both pledged and unpledged convention delegates, depending on the party rules of the various states. The Democratic and Republican parties use different methods for determining how many delegates are awarded to, or "pledged" to vote for the various candidates at their national conventions. Democrats use a proportional method. Each candidate is awarded a number of delegates in proportion to their support in the state caucuses or the number of primary votes they won. For example, consider a state with 20 delegates at a democratic convention with three candidates. If candidate "A" received 70% of all caucus and primary votes, candidate "B" 20% and candidate "C" 10%, candidate "A" would get 14 delegates, candidate "B" would get 4 delegates and candidate "C" would get 2 delegates. In the Republican Party, each state chooses either the proportional method or a "winner-take-all" method of awarding delegates. Under the winner-take-all method, the candidate getting the most votes from a state's caucus or primary, gets all of that state's delegates at the national convention. The first step of the presidential election campaign is the announcement of the candidate proclaiming that s/he is going to run for president. In the summer of every presidential election year, political parties in the United States typically conduct national conventions to choose their presidential candidates. At the conventions, the presidential candidates are selected by groups of delegates from each state. After a series of speeches and demonstrations in support of each candidate, the delegates begin to vote, state-by-state, for the candidate of their choice. The first candidate to receive a preset majority number of delegate votes becomes the party's presidential candidate. The candidate selected to run for president then selects a vice presidential candidate. Delegates to the national conventions are selected at the state level, according to rules and formulas determined by each political party's state committee. While these rules and formulas can change from state-to-state and from year-to-year, there remain two methods by which the states choose their delegates to the national conventions: the caucus and the primary.In states holding them, presidential primary elections are open to all registered voters. Just like in general elections, voting is done through a secret ballot. Voters may choose from among all registered candidates and write ins are counted. There are two types of primaries, closed and open. In a closed primary, voters may vote only in the primary of the political party in which they registered. For example, a voter who registered as a Republican can only vote in the Republican primary. In an open primary, registered voters can vote in the primary of either party, but are allowed to vote in only one primary. Most states hold closed primaries. Primary elections also vary in what names appear on their ballots. Most states hold presidential preference primaries, in which the actual presidential candidates' names appear on the ballot. In other states, only the names of convention delegates appear on the ballot. Delegates may state their support for a candidate or declare themselves to be uncommitted. In some states, delegates are bound, or "pledged" to vote for the primary winner in voting at the national convention. In other states some or all delegates are "unpledged," and free to vote for any candidate they wish at the convention. Caucuses are simply meetings, open to all registered voters of the party, at which delegates to the party's national convention are selected. When the caucus begins, the voters in attendance divide themselves into groups according to the candidate they support. The undecided voters congregate into their own group and prepare to be "courted" by supporters of other candidates. Voters in each group are then invited to give speeches supporting their candidate and trying to persuade others to join their group. At the end of the caucus, party organizers count the voters in each candidate's group and calculate how many delegates to the county convention each candidate has won. As in the primaries, the caucus process can produce both pledged and unpledged convention delegates, depending on the party rules of the various states. The Democratic and Republican parties use different methods for determining how many delegates are awarded to, or "pledged" to vote for the various candidates at their national conventions. Democrats use a proportional method. Each candidate is awarded a number of delegates in proportion to their support in the state caucuses or the number of primary votes they won. For example, consider a state with 20 delegates at a democratic convention with three candidates. If candidate "A" received 70% of all caucus and primary votes, candidate "B" 20% and candidate "C" 10%, candidate "A" would get 14 delegates, candidate "B" would get 4 delegates and candidate "C" would get 2 delegates. In the Republican Party, each state chooses either the proportional method or a "winner-take-all" method of awarding delegates. Under the winner-take-all method, the candidate getting the most votes from a state's caucus or primary, gets all of that state's delegates at the national convention.


When a presidents runs for 2nd term does someone from his party run against him?

That does happen, and it's not as rare as I thought. Those who do challenge an incumbent President for the party nomination are usually not a serious threat, but there have been a few challenges in the past half century worth mentioning. For example, in 1976, Ronald Reagan competed against incumbent President Gerald Ford for the Republican Party Nomination. That race was too close to call right until the Republican National Convention, where Ford narrowly won the nomination. He lost the election, however. Also, in 1992 Pat Buchanan ran against incumbent President George H. W. Bush for the Republican Nomination. 73% of Republicans voted for Bush in the primaries. In 1980 Ted Kennedy (the U.S. Senator from Mass. who died in 2009 and brother of the former President) competed for the Democratic Nomination against incumbent Jimmy Carter. Although Carter had 24 Primary wins to Kennedy's 10, Kennedy refused to concede until he lost the nomination in a 2129 to 1146 vote at the Convention. Many were surprised when Eugene McCarthy ran against Lyndon Johnson for the 1968 Democratic nomination. Four years earlier Johnson had the highest percentage of popular votes of any U.S. presidential candidate since George Washington. After Johnson received only 49% of the vote at the New Hampshire primaries to McCarthy's 42%, Robert Kennedy also entered the race against Johnson. It became obvious to Johnson that the Democratic nomination was something that he was going to have to work for, but all his time was consumed by the war in Vietnam as well as the urban racial unrest domestically, so he withdrew from the election at the end of March 1968. Pete McCloskey and John Ashbrook challenged Richard Nixon for the 1972 Republican nomination. Out of 1324 delegates to the Republican Convention, Nixon won 1323 and McCloskey won 1.


If a U.S. candidate get 45 of the vote might have a majority but cannot have a plurality?

It is certainly possible to switch loyalties from one candidate to another once your chosen candidate no longer is in the race. However, many delegates continue to remain in their loyalties, although the candidate in question no longer participates. a candidate who gets 45%of the vote have a but cannot have a

Related questions

How many delegates does a candidate need to get the republican nomination?

1144 delegates are needed to win the 2012 Republican nomination.


How many delegates must a presidential candidate win to secure the republican presidential nomination?

590


How many delegates does it take To win the 2012 Republican President nomination?

1144


How many delegates to win democratic nomination in the primaries?

The delegates counts are the numbers of electors each candidate gets on election night. Both are trying to get 270.


How many delegates does a Republican need to win the nomination?

A Candidate needs to have a majority of the delegates to win. The race is over if any one candiate gets 1245 delegates, for that means they have slightly over 50% of the delegates and therefor a guarenteed majority.Here is a bunch of info from www.republicansource.comTotal Number of Delegates: 2488The allocation of delegates to the 2008 Republican National Convention, which will be held September 1-4, 2008 in a city to be announced in early 2007, is determined as follows:BASE DELEGATES Each state selects six at-large delegates. American Samoa, Virgin Islands & Guam have four at-large delegates each; Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia have fourteen at-large delegates.DISTRICT DELEGATES Each state also selects three delegates for each member it has in the U.S. House of RepresentativesBONUS DELEGATES Each state can earn additional delegates by meeting one or more of the following requirements: the state cast a majority of its votes for the Republican presidential candidate in the previous presidential election, the state elected Republicans to the U.S. House or Senate, selected a Republican Governor or state legislative majorities, and / or the state holds its presidential primary election after March 15th (this is to discourage states from holding early primaries).Bonus delegates are awarded based on the number of party members elected as Presidential Electors (2004), Governors (2004-2007), House members (2004-2007), Senators (2002-2007), and state legislatures (2004-2007).Republican delegate counts are based on the number of Republicans elected to the State Legislatures, Governors chairs, U.S. House seats, and U.S. Senators seats through 31 December 2007. Republican unpledged delegate counts are determined by state (or equivalent) party rules and assume that the policies of 2004 will apply in 2008.When an individual formally releases delegates already pledged to him or her - a withdrawing candidate must specifically free his/her own delegates to vote for whomever they might choose during the Convention - it is not a requirement for those delegates to vote for another candidate who is endorsed by the withdrawing candidate.However, history has demonstrated that most, if not all, delegates pledged to a candidate who has released them will follow that candidate's lead and vote for the candidate he/she has endorsed. Nevertheless, a withdrawing candidate may not release delegates pledged to him/her so long as the presidential nomination is still undetermined (after all, these delegates can be a valuable bargaining chip for future considerations). Even where a nomination is already determined, a presidential candidate who represents the Party fringe might hold onto his delegates as long as possible in order to get concession.Please refer to the related link for more information.


How many delegates does obama need to win nomination?

Enough.


How many republican delegates does Texas have?

230


How many republican delegates for California?

19


How many electoral votes did Trump get at the Republican Convention?

No candidate has ANY electoral votes yet. The election has not yet taken place. He has the support of 1,239 DELEGATES to the convention.


How many super delegates does Wisconsin have?

74 delegates plus 18 super delegates democratic. 40 delegates republican


How many delegates does Romney have as of 3-18-12?

As of March 18, 2012, Mitt Romney has secured 518 delegates of the 1,144 required. This number includes his 488 pledged delegates and 30 unpledged delegates. He secured 20 delegates in the Puerto Rico Primary that took place 3/18/12. This leaves him needing only 626 delegates to secure the Republican Presidential Nomination.


How many delegates do each candidate currently have?

78