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George Washington really was the "Father of his Country". He was a leader in getting the Revolution started and in setting up a provisional government. He served as Commander-in -Chief during the successful revolutionary war , helped draw up the Constitution for the new United States of America and served as the first president. He became an international figure and hero to many oppressed peoples.

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13y ago
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13y ago

As an act of respect.

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The original name that the territory wanted to use was either Lincoln State or Columbia State. (It is south and touching British Columbia) They threw Lincoln out as a name for some reason.

Someone pointed out that the name Columbia would be confused with "District of Columbia". So in a brilliant epiphany, they decided to use the name Washington instead.

. . . for the reason mentioned above.

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14y ago

George Washington was responsible for the defeat of the British which led to the creation of the USA. Washington chose the site for the Capital, and as "The Father of his country", it was felt naming the capital after him was appropriate.

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9y ago

In 1790, the US Constitution allowed for the creation of a capital city so an area in the District of Columbia - which is still legally referred to as such - was chosen, a city founded and in 1791 named after George Washington, the first president of a united states.

Although largely thought of as being the very first American president, that honour actually belongs to Peyton Randolph, who was the first president of the Continental Congress or 'United States in Congress Assembled', in laymans terms the original thirteen states. George Washington was the Continental Army's Commander-In-Chief.

There were thirteen more presidents before in 1789 George Washington was sworn in as the President of an independent United States Of America.

The capital of the US is named very appropriately after the first President, without whom there would have been no US. Washington was a great President whose leadership was essential to the success of the Revolutionary War.

Peyton Randolph (and all of his many successors, including a few who were chosen but never served) was never President of the United States; as pointed out above, he was only President of the Continental Congress, which was an unpaid, ceremonial (as well as nearly powerless) position vaguely similar to the current Speaker of the House; it bore absolutely no resemblance whatsoever to the President position in which Washington later served. When Randolph took office in 1774, the Revolutionary War hadn't even started yet! So how could he have been President of the United States before the United States even existed?

Additionally, "United States in Congress Assembled" was the name that the US went by during the brief roughly six year period after the war, when the Articles of Confederation were in effect (well after Randolph's term had ended). The Articles laid down some ground rules for electing the President of the Congress; otherwise the position remained the same as before. As the Constitution was nearing completion and ratification, the last President of the Congress resigned, and the position was never re-filled. Five months later, the Constitution had been ratified, the Congress had taken its current form, and Washington became the first President of the United States.

At best, claiming Randolph (as well as his successors up to Cyrus Griffin) was President of the bellends prior to Washington is intellectually dishonest, based purely on the similarity of the positions' names and nothing more.

Washington DC was named after President Washington because he had been the commander of the Continental military during the Revolutionary War; while not a particularly good field commander (he lost more battles than he won), he was a highly skilled organizer and logistician, an inspirational leader, and he was smart enough to take advantage of opportunities when they arose (such as at the Battles of Trenton and Yorktown, or his brilliant escape after the nearly disastrous Battle of Long Island, to name a few).

After the war, he tried to retire but was eventually made the President of the Constitutional Convention, where he ensured that the Constitution was drafted. He then became the first President, and guided the new nation through its formative years; he was careful to avoid any sort of similarity to the recently ousted British monarchy. He then set the two terms precedent, so as to further avoid any potential restoration of a monarchy. He embodied the Enlightenment ideals of the early United States, and was an easy choice for the honor of having the new capital named after him.

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11y ago

He is the father of the country of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. George Washington was the first president of the United States, and probably the most important.

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12y ago

No. George Washington was Born after Washington DC was made.

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14y ago

Yes

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Q: Why is Washington state named after George Washington?
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