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The Roman judges were called "praetors".

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The judge in a Roman court case was called a "praetor" .

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The Roman judges were called "praetors".

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Q: What were roman judges that ruled in all legal matters called?
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Related questions

Who were the Lawyers and legal writers who assisted roman judges?

Juris prudentes


What were ancient Rome judges called?

A Roman judge was called iudex.


Who were the Roman judges who ruled in all the legal matters?

twelve tables maybe?? not sure... Actually, it is the Praetors. Twelve tables was the Roman law code. But remember, the praetors had only limited authority in legal matters. If a case pertained to the wealthy and was a serious offense it would be tried by the senate. Offenses such as those involving large sums of money or property, forgery or treason were always tried before the senate. Cicero, Caesar and Tiberius all either prosecuted or defended people before the senate.


How does common law different from roman law?

Common law refers to law developed by judges through decisions of courts that are called precedent. Roman law, or civil law, differs from common law in that it is based solely on a legal code instead of precedent.


What does a roman judge do?

A Roman judge in ancient Rome was responsible for presiding over legal cases, interpreting the law, and handing down judgments. They were tasked with ensuring that trials were conducted fairly, evidence was presented accurately, and justice was served according to Roman law. Roman judges played a crucial role in maintaining order and upholding the legal system of the Roman Empire.


The first written law of rome was called the?

The first written law of Rome was called the Twelve Tables. These laws were written on bronze tablets and displayed in the Roman Forum around 450 BC. The Twelve Tables covered a range of civil matters and played a significant role in shaping Roman society and legal system.


How did Rome's judges serve?

It depends. The public officials charged with (among other things) the final responsibility for legal and judicial matters were the Praetors, elected for a one-year period. They sometimes officiated as judges themselves - in cases 'worthy of their attention'- but in most cases they appointed others as judges. In civic disputes the Praetor rarely figured; there the parties together chose a judge they could agree on - a bit like in today's mediation.Anyone could act as judge who was a free-born Roman citizen who had put his name on a list of people available and willing to do the job. No legal training was required. A judge could call on a outside lawyer for expert advice, but was not bound by his opinion. These judges could be appointed or chosen as long as they were willing and able, and on the list, so they had no fixed term of office.


What is the judge in a Roman court case?

The judge in a Roman court case is called praetors (PREE-tuhrz).


Where did ancient roman judges live?

This may sound like a silly answer, but Roman judges lived in their houses. They had no special housing given to them. No official in the Roman government was provided with housing except the Pontifex Maximus.


What did judges wear in Ancient Roman times?

Robes


Who commanded armies and oversaw the legal system?

The people who commanded the armies and ran the legal system were called Praetors. They were appointed by the Roman government.


How long did Rome's judges serve?

It depends. The public officials charged with (among other things) the final responsibility for legal and judicial matters were the Praetors, elected for a one-year period. They sometimes officiated as judges themselves - in cases 'worthy of their attention'- but in most cases they appointed others as judges. In civic disputes the Praetor rarely figured; there the parties together chose a judge they could agree on - a bit like in today's mediation.Anyone could act as judge who was a free-born Roman citizen who had put his name on a list of people available and willing to do the job. No legal training was required. A judge could call on a outside lawyer for expert advice, but was not bound by his opinion. These judges could be appointed or chosen as long as they were willing and able, and on the list, so they had no fixed term of office.