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Laborers who worked for pay earned about a penny per day for much of the Middle Ages. The source listed below places the maximum pay for laborers at two pounds per annum, with is about a penny and a half per day. The Middle Ages lasted 1000 years, and there was a lot of variation. The penny was a coin about the size of a US dime or UK 5 pence, and it was made of silver.

Peasants were often unpaid farmers who gave their landlords a share of the crop as rent and had little need for money. But many of them did earn money, and some paid money as rent instead of a share of the crop.

Please see the link below.

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13y ago
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13y ago

1st Answer:

They weren't paid.

2nd Answer:

Servants got paid. How much depended on job title and experience. There is a link below to a site giving wages for various people, but not much in the way of servants. Kitchen servants got 2 to 4 shillings per year, or 2 to 4 pence per month, according to that site. Since the same list says weavers got 5 pence per day, though with not food, I would assume the servant's wages included room and board.

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13y ago

At the low end of the pay scale were the youngest apprentices, who might have earned a penny in the course of a month, enough to buy four loaves of bread. They were also given food, clothing, and a place to live, so in theory they did not need much.

In 14th century England laborers worked for 1 to 2 pence per week. Skilled laborers got more, up to 2 to 4 pence per day.

The lowest paid soldiers got 2 pence per day. Knights got 2 shillings, or 24 pence.

Please see the link below, which provides a long list of wages and prices.

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13y ago

Apprentices got very little when they were just starting out. The link below is to a site at Fordham University that gives wages and prices. According to that site, boys and pages got 1s to 6s (12 to 72 pence) per year in the 14th century. At about the same time, laborers were getting 5s to 8s 8d (60 to 104 pence) per year, and master masons were getting 4 pence per day.

A 16th century set of wages shows apprentice armorers getting about a quarter of the pay of regular armorers.

One thing to bear in mind is that apprentices were usually given room and board, and sometimes given clothes.

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12y ago

Priests were paid absolutely nothing - they depended entirely on the contributions donated by their parishioners.

In town parishes with a high population density, priests could be fairly well off; they were given donations for conducting burials, weddings and baptisms, they recieved a kind of tax called church-scot and they also received a proportion of tithes collected from all the craftsmen and skilled workers,

In more rural parishes, with fewer people to make donations, priests could be extremely poor despite receiving a proportion of agricultural tithes. They were forced to grow their own food and keep a few animals and poultry to provide milk, meat and eggs.

Certain priests were called chaplains; these were funded entirely by a nobleman and his family to staff a private chapel, praying constantly on their behalf. Chaplains were therefore not reliant on donations and had everything supplied by the nobleman.

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15y ago

not a lot. the land owners where tight

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11y ago

as much as saul antonios mom on union

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Q: How much did a medieval peasant earn?
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