answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

Feudalism is a political and military system between a feudal aristocrat (a lord or liege), and his vassals. Feudalism flourished from the ninth century to the fifteenth century. In its most classic sense, feudalism refers to the Middle_AgesEuropean political system composed of a set of reciprocal legal and military obligations among the warrior nobility, revolving around the three key concepts of lords, vassals, and Fief. Although derived from the Latin word feodum (fief), then in use, the term feudalism and the system it describes were not conceived of as a formal political system by the people living in the Medieval Period.

User Avatar

Wiki User

13y ago
This answer is:
User Avatar
More answers
User Avatar

Wiki User

14y ago

A political and economic system of Europe from the 9th to about the 15th century, based on the holding of all land in fief or fee and the resulting relation of lord to vassal and characterized by homage, legal and military service of tenants, and forfeiture

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

14y ago

Feudalism is a form of government that in controlled by a king but the king then gives out land to lords for their trust. This helps the King rule the land successfully and makes ruling a whole lot easier. The lords were in charge of a section of land and people would live on there land so the lords gave them jobs and homes but than collected taxes. The lords took just enough taxes that the pheasants could get by but couldn't revolt or move up in stature. And lords then give out some of their land to knights for once again trust and to help the lords watch over the pheasants and also collected taxes and the lords gave some of the taxes to king as well. The appeal of feudalism was that the rich and powerful retained their power.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

12y ago

Kings owned huge pieces of land, and they gave big chunks of their land to nobles in exchange for the noble's loyalty and protection in case of attack by enemies. The nobles, in turn, allowed peasants to live and work on their land. The peasants (called serfs) provided food and goods and services for the nobles, in exchange for protection from invaders. This was called feudalisim.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

12y ago

Fuedalism is a political and social system from the middle ages and Europe.

This answer is:
User Avatar

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: What is feudilism?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Continue Learning about History of Western Civilization

What was the dominant political system in the Middle Ages known as?

There was no single political system in use in Europe during the Middle Ages, though most countries were monarchies. Most medieval monarchies had a crown left to a single heir, usually, but not always, the eldest son. There were hereditary monarchies, in which the kingdom was divided among the heirs when the king died. The Kingdom of the Franks is one example. There were monarchies in which the monarch was elected. The Holy Roman Empire was one of these. There were feudal monarchies, in which the central government was weak and the local lords strong. The Kingdom of France was like this for much of its medieval existence. Some medieval governments tended toward being absolute monarchies, in which the king had all the power, though most of these came along after the Middle Ages. The Byzantine Empire retained the old Roman senatorial system until the 13th century. Iceland had a parliament whose seats were possessions a person could sell or leave to his heirs. There were monarchies other than kingdoms and empires, Catalonia, which headed by a count until one of the counts decided he was really a king. For much of the Middle Ages, most of Wales was like this as well. There was a territory headed by the Pope, called the Papal States. There were kingdoms that were no bigger than counties. The early medieval Kingdom of Kent is an example. There were independent republics, such as the Republic of Venice and the Republic of Genoa. Within some of the countries, there were many different political systems in use. In The Holy Roman Empire, there were kingdoms, counties of various types, free cities with republican governments and others.


Related questions

What were the changes in the government of medieval England?

medieval government was known as feudilism


How did Feudalism bring an organized system to Europe?

because feudilism is good


How did the battle of Hastings contribute to the rise of feudilism in England?

Because of king Henry's speech


How much power did kings have under feudalism?

The Pope had more power than the kings in that time.


How did feudalism offer a stable political system for Europe?

fuedalism brought stability by letting everyone know where he or she's place were, and what there obligations were and what they expected back. This also gave people a more stable life because of the uncertainty the Battle Of Hastings created. Suvie


What are the answers to hawns work?

1-mercenary 2-monopoly 3-apprentice 4-dynasty 5-ab 6-republic 7-tariff 8-coalition 9-socialism 10-inflation 11-apartheid 12-mandate 13-armistice 14-usury 15-social darwinism 16-artistan 17-republican 18-martyr 19-caravel 20-genocide 21-propaganda 22-feudilism 23-ultimation 24-patriarch 25- 26-theocracy 27-anarchist 28-prehistory 29-dictator 30-capitalism 31-appeasement 32-tyrant 33-literacy 34-tithe 35-sufferage 36-culture 37- 38-myth 39-racism 40-


What was the dominant political system in the Middle Ages known as?

There was no single political system in use in Europe during the Middle Ages, though most countries were monarchies. Most medieval monarchies had a crown left to a single heir, usually, but not always, the eldest son. There were hereditary monarchies, in which the kingdom was divided among the heirs when the king died. The Kingdom of the Franks is one example. There were monarchies in which the monarch was elected. The Holy Roman Empire was one of these. There were feudal monarchies, in which the central government was weak and the local lords strong. The Kingdom of France was like this for much of its medieval existence. Some medieval governments tended toward being absolute monarchies, in which the king had all the power, though most of these came along after the Middle Ages. The Byzantine Empire retained the old Roman senatorial system until the 13th century. Iceland had a parliament whose seats were possessions a person could sell or leave to his heirs. There were monarchies other than kingdoms and empires, Catalonia, which headed by a count until one of the counts decided he was really a king. For much of the Middle Ages, most of Wales was like this as well. There was a territory headed by the Pope, called the Papal States. There were kingdoms that were no bigger than counties. The early medieval Kingdom of Kent is an example. There were independent republics, such as the Republic of Venice and the Republic of Genoa. Within some of the countries, there were many different political systems in use. In The Holy Roman Empire, there were kingdoms, counties of various types, free cities with republican governments and others.


Describe the life and leadership of Napoleon Bonaparte the French Emperor?

napoleon from childhood dreamed of becoming emperor of France. this was motivated because of the sheer beauty of Europe and most likely had dreams of some day owning all this beauty. he went to school in mainland Europe to learn french and later joined a military academy after that he became commander of an artillary company where he proved himself at the siege of toulan. The rulers of France noticed very quickly and put him in command of an army of Italy after the french went to war against austria. This army was hungry and disgruntled he whiped it into shape and won victory after victory against great odds he returned to France as its brightest star . this gained him support of the people and after a failed campaign in Egypt he returned to France. there the people still admired him. i going to have to cut this short. But napoleon was a great speaker and military genius he understood how to lead a empire and an army people say he was horrible for letting all those men in is march to moscow starve and freeze to death but he suffered with his troops and did not want it to happen but it did his men loved him so much they let him leave in order to lead France any man who is so loved by a people as to give there life for him and the glory of the empire he has built for him does not deserve to be called a horrible man or a coward or greedy. he was not power hungry, he was not a maniac driven by blood lust. he wanted to build the greatest empire to ever stand. in his short reighn he abolished feudilism, built thousands of miles of roads gave freedom of religion he built more schools and made education better throughout the empire the people loved him but the other major powers of Europe did not the were jelous if anything. They though only of them selves and the threat napoleon posed to putting them out of power the last thing napoleon wanted to do was cause such devestation but he loved France to much to let it be taken away from him so easily i don't know why you say he was greedy you say he cared not of the lives spent for his glory. But he did please leave a comment any thing or contact me at www.levimalone1@yahoo.com


Which was a charteristics of feudilism?

Feudalism was a ruling mechanism introduced into the Britain by the Normans when they invaded in 1066. It was a system of paying service to a higher authority to provide labour in all forms and formed the basis for land holding across the country until is ended around 1300 in its recognisable, pure Norman form. The basic premise of the feudal system was that the king owned all the land in the kingdom. His barons simply held it of him, a gift that was viewed as hereditary but this was not always set in stone and a payment was given to the king for those lands to pass to an heir, but could, at the whim of the king, be given to someone else. The barons were required to pay homage to the king to recognise his authority over them, and they owed service to the king in return for the land, for instance, twenty knights for twenty days in service with the king, often specified in later reigns whether they were to fight at home, e.g against the Welsh or local unrest, or abroad, in crusades and France. The barons had vassels below him who similarly owned service in order to keep hold of those lands which could also mean soldiers for the baron to then hand over to the king for service, or workers on the baron's land who would work for the baron for a set number of days per year. None of this prevented taxes being paid, but this was managed by the king through his barons and through the baron through to his vassels and their underlings. It was a huge pyramid and allowed the king a strong hold on the land as, ultimately, everything belonged to the king and everyone else was essentially borrowing it from him in return for a payment of service. Feudalism was also practiced in France which caused problems for the English kings who had lands in France, ie Henry II, Richard I and John, as they were required to pay homage to the French king for those lands and owed service and thereby appearing subservient to him despite being kings in their own right themselves. They, of course, hated this. Their lack of homage and service caused the French king Philippe Auguste, to fight to take them back and the English kings fought to keep them, and by conquest could claim them free from service. This didn't happen and in the time of King John the vast bulk were lost by 1204. Feudalism gradually came to end once the king required more money to fight wars abroad, crusades and wars in France to regain what was lost. Feudalism is absolute monarchy, but once the king's barons were asked to provide money over and above their feudal requirements and such taxes began to have to be agreed by the first parliaments, the king lost this absolute rule and feudalism died. Once the king has to request from his barons anything rather than demand, his rule is no longer feudal. The loss of territories abroad also brought about a change in the feudal system earlier than the first parliaments, as those with lands solely in England wanted more stability as they had held the lands for several generations and wanted them to pass entire to their heirs without question and this formed part of Magna Carta of 1215, which came some 11 years after the loss of Normandy, the part of the French holdings that concerned the English barony the most.