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Credibility gap is a political term that came into wide use during the 1960s and 1970s. At the time, it was most frequently used to describe public skepticism about the Johnson administration's statements and policies on the Vietnam War. Today, it is used more generally to describe almost any "gap" between the reality of a situation and what politicians and government agencies say about it. "Credibility gap" was originally used in association with the Vietnam War in the New York Herald Tribune in March 1965, to describe then-president Lyndon Johnson's handling of the escalation of American involvement in the war. A number of events—particularly the surprise Tet Offensive, and later the 1971 release of the Pentagon Papers—helped to confirm public suspicion that there was a significant "gap" between the administration's declarations of controlled military and political resolution, and the reality.

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16y ago
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14y ago

Trust.

Young people used to say (in the 1960's) "don't trust anybody over 30." (Over 30 years old).

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9y ago

The Credibility gap refers to a political term used to describe public skepticism regarding the Lyndon B. Johnson administration's statements and policies on the Vietnam War.

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Q: During the Vietnam war what was the credibility gap?
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Related questions

What is the related to credibility gap related to?

The Vietnam War


What is the difference between the truth and what the presidential administration was saying during the Vietnam War?

The credibility gap


What is an example to define a credibility gap?

The difference between the truth and what the administration said during the Vietnam War.


What best defines the difference between the truth and what the presidential administration was saying during the Vietnam War?

The credibility gap


What created a credibility gap between US citizens and the US government during the Vietnam war?

The govornment frequently lied about what was going on


Nightly news coverage of the Vietnam War on television helped?

create a credibility gap


Why did a credibility gap develop in the US concerning the Vietnam war?

The gulf of tonkin resolution was discovered to be fabricated


What critics of Johnson's policies in Vietnam used this term to describe their distrust of what the Johnson administration reported to the public about the war?

Credibility gap


What was Credibility gap?

Credibility gap is a political term that came into wide use during the 1960s and 1970s. At the time, it was most frequently used to describe public skepticism about the Johnson administration's statements and policies on the Vietnam War. Today, it is used more generally to describe almost any "gap" between the reality of a situation and what politicians and government agencies say about it. "Credibility gap" was originally used in association with the Vietnam War in the New York Herald Tribune in March 1965, to describe then-president Lyndon Johnson's handling of the escalation of American involvement in the war. A number of events—particularly the surprise Tet Offensive, and later the 1971 release of the Pentagon Papers—helped to confirm public suspicion that there was a significant "gap" between the administration's declarations of controlled military and political resolution, and the reality.


What was the gap between White House statements and true events during Vietnam?

People believed there was a credibility gap between the general public and the White House. For the first time, people could see on television what was happening in the war zone, and the atrocities of war shocked Americans. They demanded answers, and the situation was too complicated for easy answers.


When did the term 'credibility gap' come into widespread usage?

The term "credibility gap" first came into wide usage in the 1960's (1963) and 1970's. It was frequently used to describe public skepticism in the then Lyndon B. Johnson administration's statements on the Vietnam war. Today however it used to describe any "gap" between the reality of a situation and what the government agencies and politicians say about it.


Who lived in Vietnam during the Vietnam war?

Q who was the victor of the Vietnam war? A I have no idea who won the Vietnam war!!!!