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Groups Targeted by the Nazis
  • Jewish
  • Rromani and Sinti ('gyspy' is a racial slur)
  • Jehovah's Witnesses
  • Protestants
  • Polish
  • Trade unionists
  • Catholics
  • common criminals
  • Blacks
  • South and East Asians
  • Incurables, the handicapped and mentally ill
  • Anyone who wasn't straight.
  • Transexuals
  • Political opponents, such as Socialists and liberals; people who helped targeted groups.
  • Soviet prisoners of war

Freemasons

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12y ago
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12y ago

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Possibly because Hitler had a very high position in the German government. This way he led the Germans to believing that Jews were the reason the Germans lost WW|. SO everyone hated them for doing this even though they didn't so it wasn't their fault. THis is how everyone targeted them.

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11y ago

Answer 1

This question implicitly has two parts. The first is a question as to the rationales that the Nazis believed in to justify Anti-Semitic beliefs and the second is a question as to why the Nazis felt the need to kill the Jews as a way to solve these Anti-Semitic concerns.

The Reasons for Anti-Semitism in Germany during that period are numerous, but some of the more important reasons were the following:

1) Decay of the German State: During the 1800s, Jews began to become more integrated in German National Life. They served in its government, its military divisions, and its industry. As was typical of Western Europe, the Jews had more of a hand in the higher echelons of government than their population percentage would account for. The Nazis saw this increasing Jewish percentage in the government as a slow takeover of German policy and a corruption of the German people. They contrasted the great victories under Bismarck with the depressing failure of World War I and noted how a much larger percentage of soldiers in the latter war were Jewish. There was also the sentiment than in the early 20th century, values were beginning to ebb (this is similar to current politics in the United States) and the Jewish integration in the German apparatus (becoming teachers, lawyers, doctors, etc.) was to blame for this recession of values as opposed to modernity as a process.

2) Nationalism: Germany was brought together under the Nationalist conception that all peoples with German culture, history, and language should be united regardless of which principality currently held control. The German self-conception also had an ethnic component, holding that the perfect German was blond and blue eyed. Regardless of the fact that the majority of Germans were dark haired, Jews stuck out like a sore thumb because they overwhelmingly had darker hair. In addition, the idea of a German Jew was still rather new and both Jews and non-Jews tended to see the Jews in Germany as being part of a vast Jewish network and that these Jews just happened to be in Germany. The Nazis capitalized on this cosmopolitan sensibility by claiming that Jews' allegiances were not to the German State, but to secret Jewish Councils organizing world events.

3) Economy: Whether it was true or not, there was perception among Germans and the Nazis in particular that Jews were wealthy individuals and had a higher per-capita income than the Germans. In many ways (because of the above two reasons) Germans felt that the Jews were "stealing" their money while they were poor and suffering.

4) Pseudo-Science: The late 19th and early 20th century was filled with radical new ideas concerning Social Darwinism. It was believed by the Pseudo-Scientific community (which was rather in vogue) that different groups of people or races exhibited different emotional traits that were linked to physical differences. This led to the belief that Jews were corrupt and thieving by their irreversible nature and that they could not be "cured" and brought up as proper Europeans. This formalized Racial Anti-Semitism in Germany and made the situation much more dire for German Jews.

5) Heresy: Although not as much an issue in World War II as it may have been 500 years prior, Jews were still considered the heretics who murdered the LORD and Savior. This helped to justify Anti-Semitism as the Jewish comeuppance for their accepting of the Christ Bloodguilt.

6) Hatred: (written by someone else) Because ppl hated them . . . . .not such a good reason, right? Its so sad . . . . . .

Why was killing the Jews necessary?

The answer to the second part, while cold, is brutally honest. The Nazis encouraged the German population to believe that this myriad of Anti-Semitic issues was ingrained in German Society by making it part of the national curriculum and teaching it to millions of German children. The Nazis proposed that the only way to improve Germany was to remove the Jews entirely. There were two options for such a removal: exile or genocide. Since no country was willing to take the Jewish population en masse (and this includes the United States and United Kingdom due to prevailing stereotypes there) the Nazis made the executive decision to commit genocide to "save Germany".

Answer 2

They were killed from 3 main reasons:

1. racism against them- hatred is free of charge.

2. suspicion for killing Jesus.

3. suspicion for doing bad things- it's not true...

Jews were killed by Nazi Germany because Hitler hated the Jews and Jews weren't part of the Aryan race so they killed them, Nazi Germany killed anyone who wasn't German and was therefore Non-Aryan.

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12y ago

Hitler needed someone to blame someone for Germany's pathetic state. by blaming them he gained popularity in Germany

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12y ago

there was a reason why each group was targeted, but generally speaking because he did not want them in his society.

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13y ago

because they were deemed to be a lower class of human being by the Nazis

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12y ago

. The Jews Were Targeted During The Holocaust Because ; during The Holocaust most jews were put in concertration camps german's blammed many things upon them

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Q: Why was the Jewish people targeted during the Holocaust?
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What other races died during the Holocaust?

The only races targeted for complete destruction were the Jews and the 'gypsies'. Many other groups were also targeted, but either were not ethnic groups (races) or were not targeted for completed destruction.


Who were the people targeted during the holocaust?

The 'undermeshcen' although the 'final solution' was technically the 'final solution to the Jewish problem' so it was only the Jews. However gypsies, homosexual, asocials and the Nazis political opponents were also sent to the death camps.


Did any Jewish people renounce being Jewish during the Holocaust?

Yes, but being Jewish in the Holocaust was not judged by one's self, it was determined by the Nazis.


How many people died in Australia during the Jewish holocaust?

2


Why were Jewish people globally recognized as victims of the Nazi Holocaust?

Because the Jewish people were the ones targeted, persecuted and murdered by the Nazis during the holocaust. Hitler declared his disdain for the jews, therefore his army, under his orders, slaughtered them by the millions. There were only a few of Hitler's soldiers that secretly despised what Hitler was doing and what he stood for, but the majority of Hitler's army took a perverted pleasure in the torture, mutilation, and murder of millions of innocent people just because they were Jewish. No other people (that I know of) were targeted by the Nazis like the Jewish people were. It made no difference to them if they killed infants and children, women or men.

Related questions

Why hitler chose th jews?

Hitler hated the Jewish people and blamed them for the loss of the first world war. Hitler considered the Jewish peoples back stabbers and targeted them during the Holocaust.


When were the Jewish people badly treated?

Jewish people were treated horribly during the holocaust


Who were being attacked during the Holocaust?

Jewish people


What other races died during the Holocaust?

The only races targeted for complete destruction were the Jews and the 'gypsies'. Many other groups were also targeted, but either were not ethnic groups (races) or were not targeted for completed destruction.


What groups of people were targeted as outsiders to Nazi's?

During World War 2, they targeted the people of the Jewish religion.


Who were the people targeted during the holocaust?

The 'undermeshcen' although the 'final solution' was technically the 'final solution to the Jewish problem' so it was only the Jews. However gypsies, homosexual, asocials and the Nazis political opponents were also sent to the death camps.


Did any Jewish people renounce being Jewish during the Holocaust?

Yes, but being Jewish in the Holocaust was not judged by one's self, it was determined by the Nazis.


What civil rights did Jews have inthe Holocaust?

The Jewish people had absolutely no rights during the Holocaust.


How many people died in Australia during the Jewish holocaust?

2


What was the job of the allies during the Holocaust?

to liberate people of the Jewish faith


Why was there persecution of the Jewish people during the Holocaust?

it was one of the principles of Nazism.


How many people died during the holocaist?

11 million people were killed during the Holocaust (1.1 million children).6 million of those victims were Jewish. Other groups targeted by the Nazis were Jehovah's Witnesses, homosexuals, disabled people, and Gypsies. 11.