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The US Supreme Court is head of the Judicial Branch of government. The "inferior" courts in this branch are:

  • US District Courts
  • US Court of International Trade
  • US Court of Appeals Circuit Courts
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12y ago
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Wiki User

13y ago

No courts "report" to the US Supreme Court. The Supreme Court receives cases for their consideration from the various US Circuits Courts of Appeal. - or occasionally they will choose to hear a case that they believe has constitutional ramifications.

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12y ago

No courts "report" to US Supreme Court. All Courts in the US must follow the precedent set by the US Supreme Court.

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4y ago

hi

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Q: What kind of courts report to the Supreme Court?
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Continue Learning about American Government

The Supreme Court is mainly what kind of court?

In most cases, supreme courts are final appellate courts.


What kind of experience do US Supreme Court nominees almost always have?

Over the past few decades, most US Supreme Court nominees have had judicial experience on one of the US Courts of Appeals Circuit Courts. This is no coincidence; most justices were appointed to the Circuit Courts for the purpose of developing appellate experience and a record of jurisprudence because they had already been identified as potential future US Supreme Court justices. The Circuit Courts have become the US Supreme Court's farm team.


What cases are heard in the supreme court?

The Supreme Court decides cases that are appealed by a lower court; a lower court has made a decision and one of the parties feels strongly enough that the decision was wrong that they make an appeal to the Supreme Court. The Supreme Court reviews the cases and determines which ones they will hear, they have the ability to decline to review a case. The Supreme Court doesn't hear only appeals, there are situations where it is the court of original jurisdiction. In situations where there is a disagreement between states, the Supreme Court has the authority to decide.


What kind of health insurance do Supreme Court justices have?

Rubbish health insurance, you should check out NHS!


What is the first major body of the judicial branch?

"In the United States, the Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the country, with powers of judicial review first asserted in Calder v. Bull (1798) in Justice Iredell's dissenting opinion. The power was later given binding authority by Justice Marshall in Marbury v. Madison (1803). Each U.S. state has a state supreme court, though some do not actually use the term "supreme court." In Maine and Massachusetts the highest court is styled the "Supreme Judicial Court", as well as the oldest appellate court of continuous operation in the Western hemisphere. In New York, Maryland, and the District of Columbia the highest court is the "Court of Appeals." (In New York, the "Supreme Court" is the trial court of general unlimited jurisdiction and the intermediate appellate court is called the "Supreme Court - Appellate Division".) In West Virginia, the highest court of the state is called "Supreme Court of Appeals." Oklahoma and Texas each have two separate highest courts, one for criminal appeals ("Court of Criminal Appeals") and one for civil cases ("Supreme Court")." -Wikipedia.comIt varies on where your finding it. As you can see wikipedia says the judicial system is jumbled. Virginia's highest court is an Appeal court.Thats court room wise. But here is a government outlook."* In common law jurisdictions, courts interpret law, including constitutions, statutes, and regulations. They also make law based upon prior case law in areas where the legislature has not made law. For instance, the tort of negligence is not derived from statute law in most common law jurisdictions. The term common law refers to this kind of law. * In civil law jurisdictions, courts interpret the law, but are, at least in theory, prohibited from creating law, and thus, still in theory, do not issue rulings more general than the actual case to be judged. In practice, jurisprudence plays the same role as case law. * In socialist law, the primary responsibility for interpreting the law belongs to the legislature." -Wikipedia.comIt varies on what exactly your looking for in the topic. I hope these excerpts helped you abit!

Related questions

The Supreme Court is mainly what kind of court?

In most cases, supreme courts are final appellate courts.


What kind of experience do US Supreme Court nominees almost always have?

Over the past few decades, most US Supreme Court nominees have had judicial experience on one of the US Courts of Appeals Circuit Courts. This is no coincidence; most justices were appointed to the Circuit Courts for the purpose of developing appellate experience and a record of jurisprudence because they had already been identified as potential future US Supreme Court justices. The Circuit Courts have become the US Supreme Court's farm team.


What are the 4 levels of state court and the jurisdiction of each one?

The four levels of state court are: trial courts (where cases are initially heard), intermediate appellate courts (where decisions from trial courts can be appealed), supreme courts (the highest state court that hears appeals from intermediate appellate courts), and specialty courts (such as family court or probate court that handle specific types of cases). The jurisdiction of each court varies, but generally trial courts have original jurisdiction over most cases, while appellate courts have jurisdiction to review decisions made by trial courts. Speciality courts have jurisdiction over specific types of cases assigned to them.


What kind of cases does Supreme Court Hears?

The Supreme Court hears three kinds of cases. Cases appealed from lower federal courts account for two-thirds of the cases they hear. They also hear cases appealed from state's supreme courts, and sometimes hear cases that have not been previously heard by a lower court, such as between one state's government and another.


What kind of judges does the supreme court have?

They are called supreme court justice


The supreame courts usually what kind of cases?

There is no telling which case or what kind of a case the Supreme Court will hear. If a case is simple, it never will get to the Supreme Court. Cases that reach the Supreme Court have gone through one or more appeals processes. Sometimes a appeal reaches the Supreme Court when a federal court of appeals has made a ruling different from another federal court of appeals. In that case, the supreme court is asked to certify an issue. That is a fancy term meaning to play referee. The Supreme Court certifies an issue when it takes up an issue where district courts of appeal have made different rulings concerning the application of the same law. (Sometimes the Supreme Court refuses to take up the issue. In that case it simply states, "Cert. Denied.") Normally, all cases that reach the Supreme Court have come from the Federal Courts of Appeal or the Highest State Court. However, the Supreme Court reserves the right to sit as a court of original jurisdiction. The last time the Supreme Court granted a writ of Habeas Corpus was 1924. It retains that right. I doubt if any member on the Supreme Court has any idea under what conditions that would happen. Still, it retains that right.


What kind of courts are municipal courts?

This is another name for city court.


What jurisdiction do the inferior courts have and what kind of cases do they hear?

The answer depends on the specific court you're referring to. In the Federal Judiciary, the US District Courts have original jurisdiction; US Courts of Appeals Circuit Courts have appellate jurisdiction. Both state and federal cases enter the system through a trial court, which is the court of original jurisdiction. Both systems also have intermediate appellate courts below the supreme court (or court of last resort).


What kind of court administers city?

Municipal Courts


What is the difference between district courts circuit court?

It really depends what kind of courts you are talking about and where the courts are. If the courts are federal, then a district court is a trial court and a circuit court is an appeals court, which may review a trial decision from a district court. For state courts, the difference between a district court and a circuit court will depend on what state the courts are in. Many states have courts called "district court" and "circuit court," but what kinds of cases these courts handle differs state to state.


What kind of court administer city ordinances?

Municipal Courts


How does a district court differ from the circuit court?

It really depends what kind of courts you are talking about and where the courts are. If the courts are federal, then a district court is a trial court and a circuit court is an appeals court, which may review a trial decision from a district court. For state courts, the difference between a district court and a circuit court will depend on what state the courts are in. Many states have courts called "district court" and "circuit court," but what kinds of cases these courts handle differs state to state.